The Weathering Thread

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uspscsx

The Name's Really Matt...
Here's a tip: Unless you plan on representing a replacement part(I.E. A new door on a box car, a new brakewheel, etc.), do all detailing prior to weathering. This works for me.

Another thing: Have PLENTY of paper towels around whenever you're weathering with paint. That's how I do most of my weathering with paint; I simply overcoat slightly, then dab off what I don't want. It does great for me.

Now, if you'll excuse me, I have to finish replying to Griff(A.K.A. MRG76 on eBay)'s e-mail.
 

SpaceMouse

Fun Lover
RCH said:
Pretty cool you have a pro close by. I'll bet you've got the color wheel down pat!
You got that right, but it's more like,

"Babe, what do I mix with this to get a color like that."

"Can you show me :rolleyes:"
 

SpaceMouse

Fun Lover
dthurman said:
Chip, you got my interest up on what an ore jenny would look like, and I can see why you don't have any pictures of a silver mine, I googled and came up pretty emtpy on pictures, but lots of text.

I did find this web site that has pictures of the little mine cars, you may be able to use them as a reference of what to do to the ore cars

http://www.goldrush.com/~kreissb/phil/photos.html
Nice little site. It will definately help. I have 3 of those little suckers I haven't built yet.
 

uspscsx

The Name's Really Matt...
Here is what I usually use for weathering:
  • Paint thinner.
  • Oil-based paints(Haven't used them yet, but I plan on getting some.) I'll use them for rust patches. You have to admit: SOME rusty areas just don't look textured.
  • Rubber cement. Used for replicating peeling paint. See MrKluke's thread on a BN/CB&Q hopper over on The Railwire to see how it's used.
  • Either a stiff piece of cardboard or a small piece of plastic. Used for puddling hairspray to dip brushes/cosmetic sponges into...which brings me to my next item.
  • Cosmetic sponges! Used for textured rust and/or "splashes" of rust/grime/oil/whatever else. See modeltrainsweathered.com for the "rust" method.
  • Testors Clear Parts and Window Maker Cement
  • A ton of brushes(You might want to use seperate brushes for chalks and for paints...although I admit to using one for the other..)
  • Various paints. I ALWAYS have Polly Scale Rust, Polly Scale Grimy Black, and Polly Scale Oily Black. (Oily black REALLY does leave an oily appearance-Perfect for trucks/wheelsets!)
  • Testors' Model Master Model Cement(For when I break a stirrup ;))
  • A FEW colored pencils(They work!) Usually only colors like variaties of brown, black, and sometimes a blue or red...depending on what I'm working on.
  • Testors Dullcote! The stuff WORKS!
  • Water...for obvious reasons.
  • Pump Hairspray(Meaning NON-Aerosol)
  • Screwdrivers to remove trucks and couplers.
  • Various colors of chalk. (Right now I have a color for everything!)
  • An XACTO-My favorite "fading tool!"
  • Gel Pens(For graffiti)
  • Forgot to mention this above: Containers for storing chalk.
  • Alcohol(The rubbing variety;)) I don't drink anyway..
  • Artist Crayons-Perfect for rust streaks and highlighting areas!
  • PAPER TOWELS-You will NEED them, trust me.
  • Microbrushes-I can't weather without one.
  • Sand paper/Sandpaper(However you prefer to spell it) Useful in SOME cases for fading.
 

uspscsx

The Name's Really Matt...
To add to above:
  • Masking tape.
  • See-through tape.
  • Toothpicks
  • Prototype photo(s) if necessary.
  • A good desk lamp!
  • And one final thing: A television with football/baseball/basketball on the screen!

I HOPE this is it! Sheesh, now I see why my weathering desk is so crowded! ;)
 

uspscsx

The Name's Really Matt...
Here's another tip: Always keep your weathering desk clean and tidy. It can help a lot, trust me.
 
D

dthurman

Guest
uspscsx said:
Here's another tip: Always keep your weathering desk clean and tidy. It can help a lot, trust me.
LOL! I am lucky to get to my keyboard...
 

Steve B

Firefighter
I have used the Woodland Scenics earth tones for weathering, they were sat around so i thought i would give them a try, i used black, burnt umber, white mainly. I also used an Instant Rust product from the local DIY store, you paint on a goopy base coat thenwhen it's dried apply the top coat, it then goes rusty overnight, the product goes on working for months giving a very old rusty look to anything you put it on, even plastic Atlas bridges
these are some of the things i used the above mixture on
101135771.gif

95900270.gif

94186465.gif

105238522.gif
 
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uspscsx

The Name's Really Matt...
Once again, the wreck in the river looks great! Now that I notice the bridge being weathered, I gotta give you 5 stars on that as well! And the BN hopper looks pretty good as well.


Overall, I give you two thumbs up. :)
 

uspscsx

The Name's Really Matt...
TIP: You know those little placemats kids have? Y'know, the ones with those "fun" games on them? Those work great to weather on if you are not in a "protected' environment. It may get a little tricky using paints, but for chalks/powders, it works great! I have a weathering desk, but I still use these, as they work great.
 

uspscsx

The Name's Really Matt...
Rust Streaks

TIP: When using pump hairspray and chalk to create rust streaks or patches, you usually want to dip your cosmetic sponge or whatever you're using into the puddle of hairspray, then cover the wet area of the sponge with chalk. Depending on how you use it, it can create an effect like this:
PA141302.png

Or this:
P9301194.png

The above was done by lightly dabbing it around the edges of the car. It has since been removed, and will be redone. The picture at top was done by dabbing it all down the side of the car. The top rust effects were created by "over-weathering" the car a little bit, then taking a wet paper towel and washing away the rust into the effect shown.

More tips to come, so stay tuned.

NOTE: All above photos copyright (©)Appalachian Weathering and Modelworks
 
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uspscsx

The Name's Really Matt...
TIP: A "cote" of Dullcote before using chalks helps the chalk "stick" to the surface. Chalks need something with "tooth" to grab onto. A coat of Dullcote gives the car the needed surface for chalk to stick to.

More to come.
 

Steve B

Firefighter
Chears Matt, i have only been doing this for 3 years and have learned a lot in that time, when i look in British mags the tecniques are very dated or they seem to be after looking through MR and the Forums, when the wife saw me attack the alco she thought i had gone nuts, but she can now see why i did it and likes it.
 

uspscsx

The Name's Really Matt...
Steve B said:
Chears Matt, i have only been doing this for 3 years and have learned a lot in that time, when i look in British mags the tecniques are very dated or they seem to be after looking through MR and the Forums, when the wife saw me attack the alco she thought i had gone nuts, but she can now see why i did it and likes it.
I don't think you listed what you use to weather...if you did, could you point me in the right direction, but if not, what do you use?

I'm still drooling over that Alco.;)
 
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D

dthurman

Guest
uspscsx said:
TIP: A "cote" of Dullcote before using chalks helps the chalk "stick" to the surface. Chalks need something with "tooth" to grab onto. A coat of Dullcote gives the car the needed surface for chalk to stick to.

More to come.
The only problem I had with Dullcote on the car first is when I used oils and thinner, I got that cloud effect like you do with rubbing alcohol. I was a little perturbed when that happened, so I just covered the hopper with more chalk. You are right though, it does give a better bite for chalk. I think I need to pre-game each car I am weathering and decide if it's a chalk job and acrylics or an oil and thinner job. Just something I had happen, it could be the type of thinner I used.
 




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