post your model RR tips........

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Greg@mnrr

Section Hand
Use a ring binder to store the instructions sheets, decoders manuals, parts diagrams and shipping or invoices for items I purchased, especially from the web. The old invoices are especially valuable for references to items purchased and I can't remember where I purchased certain items.

Greg
 
I have been toying around with the idea of using double sided foam tape to serve as a clean way of securing track to bench. it also serves as a good underlay and any easy way of securing ballast without glues and spray. There have been a few trial and error issues that needed to be ironed out. First cut the tape to track length "don't" lay tape under joiner's it's a nightmare to deal with if you make an error. Second, its hard to correct errors so be sure you are happy with where your track is position before adding tape (have it all marked up so the positioning is easy to follow). If you can get it right first time it will actually save you a bit of time over all.
 

Greg@mnrr

Section Hand
I have been toying around with the idea of using double sided foam tape to serve as a clean way of securing track to bench. it also serves as a good underlay and any easy way of securing ballast without glues and spray. There have been a few trial and error issues that needed to be ironed out. First cut the tape to track length "don't" lay tape under joiner's it's a nightmare to deal with if you make an error. Second, its hard to correct errors so be sure you are happy with where your track is position before adding tape (have it all marked up so the positioning is easy to follow). If you can get it right first time it will actually save you a bit of time over all.
I would be concerned about using double back tape to secure track to the bench work for several reasons...

- You'll still need to using some type of white glue to secure the ballast since the tape's adhesive is not enought to hold the ballast so it looks finished.
- The moisture in any ballast glue may affect the tape's top and bottom layer of paper.
- Using the tape loses the taper sides of a railroad roadbed.
- The foam tape maybe hard to bend to the proper radius.
- I don't think you'll save any time with foam tape verses cork.

Just my opinion.

Greg
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I would be concerned about using double back tape to secure track to the bench work for several reasons...

- You'll still need to using some type of white glue to secure the ballast since the tape's adhesive is not enought to hold the ballast so it looks finished.
- The moisture in any ballast glue may affect the tape's top and bottom layer of paper.
- Using the tape loses the taper sides of a railroad roadbed.
- The foam tape maybe hard to bend to the proper radius.
- I don't think you'll save any time with foam tape verses cork.

Just my opinion.

Greg
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Hi Greg

I agree it can be cumbersome at first, you kind of need a system in place. I mark out where my track will be placed with a felt tip pen. here I pre measure my straights and curves. I then prepare the track by pre soldering the track to the right lengths I need to either cover straights or curved areas. I place the foam strip under the track first neatly before applying the foam to the bench. I generally leave 20 to 30 mm on each end for play. I never place foam tape under unsoldered rail joiners. They can be difficult to pry free and may damage track. When I apply the foam to the bench, I work it through a little at a time to make sure the bed is flat. This process works fine with straits and curves.

The issues you have identified I pretty much agree with, you will not eliminate glueing altogether unless you're fine with not gluing the ballast down completely.

When spreading the ballast across the sticky underlay you will find it will spread the ballast much further and fairly evenly. Where I would apply glue would be more on the side of the track rather than cover the whole thing. I haven't had any issues with moister thus far but I think its worth mentioning considering that there is a possibility it may affect your layout.
Where it has saved me time is that I was able to have ballast in place around the same time the track was laid.

Tapering: I agree you do lose the taper but if you are cutting your own cork, as I have done in the past from cork sheeting it makes no real difference because you don't have a taper to start with. I found cork sheeting to be a cheaper alternative. I use 1mm foam tape for that reason, it doesn't raise the track too high and its easy to ballast edges.
The other uses I have found that works well with foam tape is if you have leveling issues and you need to prop up certain areas of track.

I agree this method may not be for everyone, I submitted this as simply another option. The traditional ways of doing things have been tried and tested for many years which is why they are still highly effective methods.

Cheers Chef
 
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