Painting/Weathering Brick

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Well my Walthers order finally arrived (incorrect I might ad - we'll see how correct the problem) So now ive got 10 or So buildings to paint.. How does everybody do their brick..both paint and weathering. Lookin for some good idea's to try out on all these bldgs of mine..
 

SpaceMouse

Fun Lover
There are as many ways to paint and weather brick as there are people who do it. I like to paint the brick a brick color even if it is already a brick color, then use a grout colored wash of thinned acrylic paint. This will fill the gaps give the brick a slightly aged look. then I go back and paint a few of the bricks a different color, either off-white, grey or black depending on the look I'm trying to duplicate. Then I'll go back and add water stains dirt splashes where needed.

There are lots of different ways of doing it.

Another way is to paint the whole thing grout color and to dry brush the brick color over it.
 
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grove den

naturally natural trees
Hello 4starcstms,

Spacemouse is right!:
There are as many ways to paint and weather brick as there are people who do it
The method I use is almost like the Space Mouce's Only difference is: I paint the walls before I glue it together. I use "Humbroll" paint(matt!) to give the wall a "Brick" color
let it dry one day and paint the wall again with a thinned kind of grey( cementcolor ,this color is also from "Humbroll" I thinned it with "white spirit"
This kind of paint is almost like water and will flow immediatly/all by itself ONLY in the joints/gapes.
IMPORTANT: the walls have to be horizontal when you ad the thinned cement color!!!!
if everything has dryed again and the "cement color" is not enough just repeat it once more...

Jos
 

HaggisKennedy

Coal Shoveler
I use the 'black prime, drybrush' method of painting brick structures, if the walls don't already come in a brick color.

Start off by spraying all the walls with black primer paint. Cheapest stuff you can find at a big-box. After it dries, use a large brush and stroke on partially dry white paint onto the black in random swatches. When you're done, you should have areas that are all black, areas that are all white, areas that are partially each in various percentages combo.

Then, drybrush your brick color onto the walls. What this does is three things: 1) on the black, you will get a darker colored brick. On the white, you will get a lighter color brick. On the combos, it'll be a mixture. This is basically a 'one step' weathering technique, because you get three shades in one shot.

After this dries, use a small brush (like an 00 or 1/0) and cover random individual bricks in brick color. This will highlight.

You may or may not want to do a wash to simulate the grout, but it's sometimes not necessary because the white in Step 2 may already do that.

You get the best results if the grout lines are deep. I do my best work on stone buildings.

Kennedy
 

grove den

naturally natural trees
Haggiskennedy:
I use the 'black prime, drybrush' method of painting brick structures, if the walls don't already come in a brick color.
That's a fine method too!
I have to try that one . Hope it will work with/on the small N scale bricks and grouts...
Thanks!

Jos
 
I painted one of my brick bldgs... Pretty happy with the result..still gotta do some things, but im really happy with the 'brick' color
 

RexHea

RAIL BENDER
Man, you guys couldn't have started this thread at a better time. I am getting ready to start building a town with all the buildings. Very good website Scott. Thanks Bunch!
 

RexHea

RAIL BENDER
Hey fellows! Don't stop posting! I'm sure many of you have some very good ideas and methods we all would be interested in.
 

Rico

BN Modeller
Here's a shot of "Bentnose Willies Bar & Grill", yet another incomplete project.
I found it in a consignment bin. (gotta love those bins!)
Someone spent a few hours highlighting individual bricks with a paint pen or such, I plan to do likewise on other foreground buildings.
I like some of the ideas you guys are putting up here,think I'll try a few!
 

CP9302

Member
I usually start with the walls a brick colour. I don't always paint them, even though I know I should! I then paint everything with the grout colour and wipe the paint off the bricks right away. This leaves some grout coloured stains on some bricks. It has to be done in smaller sections so the grout doesn't dry too much. I usually paint some of the bricks different colours for varriety.

Another method I've read, but not tried, is very similar to the above, but you let the grout colour dry and then us an eraser to remove the paint from the brick face. A variation on that method is to paint brick several different shades of colour and then paint the grout. This way when you erase the grout, depending on how much you erase, you uncover different shades underneath.
 

railBuilderDhd

Active Member
I guess you can put in as much or as little time as you want but I don't think painting every brick individually will always look good.
 

HaggisKennedy

Coal Shoveler
I don't normally paint every brick, though when I start picking individual bricks (or stones, for that matter) to paint, it's easy to go overboard and do a whole pile of them. The number you might end up doing can add up quickly, because you get into a production mode.

There was one time I was painting a stone building, and picked a whole pile of individual stones to paint in various 'other' colors. I remember thinking 'wow, that went fast'....

Kennedy
 

tlark

Member
Did you use paint from a spray can ? If I may ask what particular brand/color are you using as well. Thanks
 

Mansquatch

New Member
A technique I picked up over modeltrainsweathered.com was the use of hairspray, like aquanet, to seal a watercolor based wash. In my efforts to learn this technique I noticed something else about the aerosol hair spray: It adds a very appealing, weathered texture to whatever you are painting. You then add subsequent layers and you end up with a very nice looking piece of rolling stock.

When I first attempted this technique the appearance after the spray dried reminded me of the texture of a brick wall. I was planning on trying to incorporate this into some of the building models I am building for a small town section of my club's layout. I thought I'd share it here if anyone else would like to give it a try.
 
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