Honest Opinions Please

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grande man

Bonafied Grande Nut
This is one of the few weathering jobs I've done that include the use of india ink. The truth shouldn't hurt, so fire away. ;)

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SpaceMouse

Fun Lover
Can you post a larger version of the picture. Looks good from what I can see. I'm looking for dirt on the trucks and on the bay doors. Paint looks about right for fade.
 

enjineerbill

Avid People Watcher
I think it looks great Eric. And you can pass off the red on the lower right by saying it was a fusee, right?

Johnny
 

SpaceMouse

Fun Lover
Okay, the reason I asked about the prototype. The dark stains between the ribs look good, but they don't look right. I was wondering if it was me.
 

grande man

Bonafied Grande Nut
Yeah, that's why I posted it. I like the india ink stains but they are a different look than other models I've done that have the darkened areas near the verticle ribs.
 

CP9302

Member
I think it looks good. I like the "normal" weathering job a little better as coal dust tends to collect more along the rivet lines like the "normal" weathered hopper. But they both look good.
 

grande man

Bonafied Grande Nut
I think it looks good. I like the "normal" weathering job a little better as coal dust tends to collect more along the rivet lines like the "normal" weathered hopper. But they both look good.
Kinda makes me wonder what it would look like if I did both. :) One thing's for sure, it would be a "dirty" hopper.
 

RexHea

RAIL BENDER
Darn Eric! I like them both, but lean a bit to the first in the thread. The stains on the side look typical of a coal stained car, but wonder if it would help adding a little chalk down the rivets and blend into the the other stain. You could always wash it off if it doesn't work.

EDIT: Well, you thought of it first. Ha!
 
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sushob

Entrepreneurial Teen
Kinda makes me wonder what it would look like if I did both. :) One thing's for sure, it would be a "dirty" hopper.
I should snap a pic of the drag of coal hoppers that runs to the local power plant pretty regularly...some of the ugliest things you could imagine :eek: I think they were originally black, then had a few panels painted out in blue, which is now faded almost to white, and have patches to the point where you wonder if they're worth fixing anymore :rolleyes: . Gotta love 'em though...they get the job done...
 

Smoke

Southern Railway lives on
I think you need more coal dust on the rivets like your "normal" weathering. Otherwise I like it.

-Smoke
 
I can see the difference in the two, however I think they both look good. Could someone show me their technique or a reference?
 

B_Kosanda

Member
Is that a wash of india ink? Usually you see it settle near the seams, but it doesn't look like that what this does.

Bill
 

grande man

Bonafied Grande Nut
Is that a wash of india ink? Usually you see it settle near the seams, but it doesn't look like that what this does.

Bill
Well, as usual, there's a right way, wrong way and grande man's way. :D

I typically just brush india ink lightly on one side of the model and then follow that by brushing alcohol to create the streaks when the ink washes away.
 
Thanks thats a help. I really think yours came out nice. Is one of those things I have never tried. I guess hasn't been as important as some of my many operational projects. I have some chalks I found at Michaels {local crafts store} for a couple bucks. My LHS said he didnt carry them and I should airbrush but I am not that confident with the airbrush yet.
 

lemscate

Member
Friction bearing wheels

I know it's probably not what you were looking for, but I'd like to offer one bit of constructive criticism. Almost no one gets this right: the wheel faces on friction bearing trucks are black, not rust orange/brown. Oil from the bearing leaks onto the wheel face and collects road grime.





Notice the black wheels on the 1xxx cars. Even in iron ore country, where everything is covered by rust and red-brown ore dust, the wheel faces on the friction bearing trucks are black, as well as around the journal box. The 9xxx cars have roller bearing inserts, so they're rusty and dusty. The wheel backs and axles are rusty on both bearing types.

With as rare as friction bearings are these days, and just as rare as color photos from when they were common, it's an easy mistake to make. I never noticed until it was pointed out to me. Thought I'd pass this little tidbit along!
 




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