History of All Kinds

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Bruette

Well-Known Member
May 22, 1963, after the Yankees had blown a 7-0 lead to Kansas City, Mickey Mantle ended the game with an 11th inning blow off Bill Fischer that almost cleared the RF roof at Yankee Stadium.

"The hardest ball I ever hit," Mantle later commented. One physicist estimated the ball would have gone 620 feet if the ball, still rising, had not struck the façade.
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Source: 1960s Baseball - Facebook
 

Bruette

Well-Known Member
#TrainTalk: Physical remnants of the B&O's legacy remain abundant throughout the city of Baltimore. Locals are sure to the recognize the building pictured here as Mt. Royal Station! To learn more about the B&O's landmarks throughout the city and check out an interactive map showcasing B&O locations in Baltimore, visit BOLivesOn.org
📷B&O Railroad Museum Collection
Please DONATE today at BORail-Donate.org to preserve the B&O's legacy. When you do, you'll be entered to win an amazing railroad experience!
#BOTrainTalk #MuseumFromHome #Baltimore #BmoreHistory #MtRoyal #VirtualExhibit #GiftsofGratitude #Support
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Source: B&O Railroad Museum Facebook
 

Bruette

Well-Known Member
#TrainTalk: Built at Mt. Clare during the Civil War in 1863, the "Thatcher Perkins" was designed for pulling heavier passenger trains through the railroad's mountainous stretch between Cumberland, MD and Wheeling, WV. Thatcher Perkins, namesake of this historic locomotive, twice held the position of "Master of Machinery" for the B&O, and as such was responsible for all the B&O workers who constructed and repaired the railroad's rolling stock. The Thatcher Perkins remains on display at the B&O Railroad Museum today.

Please DONATE today at BORail-Donate.org to preserve the B&O's legacy. When you do, you'll be entered to win an amazing railroad experience!

#BOTrainTalk #MuseumFromHome #ThatcherPerkins #RailroadHistory #Baltimore #BaltimoreHistory #BORailroad
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Source: B&O Railroad Museum Facebook
 

Iron Horseman

Well-Known Member
It makes me upset (approaching anger) that 99% of Americans only know the first verse. Or what I call the "sports" version national anthem. Why can't we sing the 4th verse with the "Triumph" in it. I always thought the 2nd verse was more appropriate right after the 911 events. But we seem happy to just sing the "question" verse without any of the answers.
 

Bruette

Well-Known Member
It makes me upset (approaching anger) that 99% of Americans only know the first verse. Or what I call the "sports" version national anthem. Why can't we sing the 4th verse with the "Triumph" in it. I always thought the 2nd verse was more appropriate right after the 911 events. But we seem happy to just sing the "question" verse without any of the answers.
A good question, but I have no answer.
 

Bruette

Well-Known Member
The Emma Giles was the best known and most popular sidewheel passenger steamer that operated out of Baltimore, Maryland.
One of her more popular destinations was Tolchester Beach, Maryland.
She docked at the Nowell pier on Parrish Creek and later at the Shady Side pier when serving the West River. The Emma Giles made two trips per week between Baltimore and Shady Side, but by the 1930s, it increased its service to five trips per week.
She served the Rhode River between 1891 and 1932, making five trips per week.
In Annapolis, Maryland, she docked at a wharf at the foot of Prince George Street.
Collision
On New Year's Day 1924, the Emma Giles collided with an ocean-going freighter, the SS Steel Trader owned by U.S. Steel in heavy fog near the Little Choptank River. The Emma Giles sustained damage on her starboard side, including her paddle. 52 passengers were aboard at the time but none were injured.[7] She was towed back to Baltimore by the tug Brittania, repaired and returned to service.
Fate
After ending service as a steamer, she functioned as a barge, then a breakwater. Eventually, the Emma Giles was towed up the Patapsco River and Curtis Creek beyond the Pennington Avenue Bridge and burned to facilitate salvage of metal parts. As of 2005, its stern was still visible and had been spray painted with a sign that says "Free to good home."
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Source: Bob Wynn‎ - Maryland Towns, People, Places and maybe a little history. Facebook
 

Bruette

Well-Known Member
The Orioles’ 1971 pitching rotation featured four 20-game winners, a feat that had only been accomplished once in MLB history - by the 1920 Chicago White Sox
Jim Palmer ended 1971 with a 20-10 record and a 2.71 earned run average, while Dave McNally went 21-5 with a 2.89, Mike Cuellar went 20-9 with a 3.08 and Pat Dobson finished 20-8 with a 2.90. Additionally, the foursome pitched 69 complete games, with Cuellar pitching 21, Palmer 20, Dobson 18, and McNally throwing 10.
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Source: Dave Fullarton‎ - Baltimore History and Photos - NO POLITICS - Facebook
 




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