Full Size Paper Templates of Trackplan

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jdetray

Well-Known Member
I'm still trying to determine exactly how I am going to lay my track over the brown paper drawings.
That stumped me for a while, too. I considered laying track on top of the paper printouts, but that did not seem like a good idea. It would be better if I could somehow transfer the printed track plan onto the layout sub-roadbed.

At first, I tried pushing pins or thumbtacks through the paper to make a pattern of little marks on the sub-roadbed beneath the paper. I found it difficult to make sense of a zillion little marks. Then I tried cutting away the paper a little at a time and marking the sub-roadbed as I went along. That was not very accurate.

Finally, I discovered that if I touched a Sharpie to the paper, it would bleed through the paper and leave a small dot on the layout. By placing dots at key points on the track plan, especially around turnouts, it became a simple matter to remove the paper and "connect the dots" using a straight edge and a flexible curved ruler:

layout_rulers_700.png


- Jeff
 

ianacole

Well-Known Member
I printed mine out from XtracCad as well, full size, no boarders, with registration marks. Taped everything together, then taped the edges down. Then using an exacto knife, cut out the track sections, a little over-sized, then laid and glued my foam roadbed in the empty space.
 

ianacole

Well-Known Member
There was a lot of trial and error to arrive at that approach :) I first tried cutting slits along the center lines for a marker, which was way too tedious. On foam, running along the lines with a good ponce wheel worked well, but I am not using foam as a base for the new layout. I was frustrated and just staring at it when it hit me... finally.
 

beiland

Well-Known Member
Interesting ideas,...keep them coming.

I don't have 'computer drawings' to print out.

I only have it laid out of brown paper (the type that contractors use to protect flooring when doing work) that does not 'bleed thru' to my knowledge.
 

beiland

Well-Known Member
That stumped me for a while, too. I considered laying track on top of the paper printouts, but that did not seem like a good idea. It would be better if I could somehow transfer the printed track plan onto the layout sub-roadbed.

At first, I tried pushing pins or thumbtacks through the paper to make a pattern of little marks on the sub-roadbed beneath the paper. I found it difficult to make sense of a zillion little marks. Then I tried cutting away the paper a little at a time and marking the sub-roadbed as I went along. That was not very accurate.

Finally, I discovered that if I touched a Sharpie to the paper, it would bleed through the paper and leave a small dot on the layout. By placing dots at key points on the track plan, especially around turnouts, it became a simple matter to remove the paper and "connect the dots" using a straight edge and a flexible curved ruler:

View attachment 43197

- Jeff
What type of paper were you using that allowed the ink to soak thru? ...brown construction paper like that I drew my plans on??
 
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jdetray

Well-Known Member
What type of paper were you using that allowed the ink to soak thru? ...brown construction paper like this??
No. I printed my full-sized track plan from XTrackCAD to a laser printer. The paper in the laser printer was ordinary white 8-1/2 by 11 inch printer paper. I then taped the pieces of paper together to make the full-size track plan. I laid the full-size plan on the layout.

If you look back at Post #19 of this thread, you can see a portion of my full-size track plan on the layout. Using a Sharpie, I touched the paper at all of the important locations on the track plan, paying special attention to the turnouts. Each touch with the Sharpie bled through the paper and left a dot on the sub-roadbed under the paper. The Sharpie bled through the printer paper very easily.

It was then a relatively simple matter to "connect the dots" which resulted in the track plan centerline being transferred to the sub-roadbed. I used flexible rulers (see Post #21 above) to "connect the dots" where the track was curved and a straight edge to draw the straight sections.

- Jeff
 
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beiland

Well-Known Member
Hey Jeff, thanks for that idea. I discovered today that a black Sharpie pen would mark thru my brown paper. I think this is the route I will pursue.....lots easier than a pounce wheel, etc.
 




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