Airbrush clean-up solvent following Scalecoat I?

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deanej

Member
I read through multiple threads regarding the thinners for Scalecoat I and they are rather contradictory on the various forums.

I've read Scalecoat being referred to as both an enamel and as a lacquer. Obviously, it can't be both.

I would only use the manufacturers thinner for thinning for actual airbrushing.

For clean-up of my Paasche internal mix air brush, I would prefer to use a cheaper solvent rather than Scalecoat thinner.

What's appropriate? I assume lacquer thinner, but I would prefer to have it confirmed by the experts here.

Thanks once again.
 

wheeler1963

Aurora & Portland Owner
Dean, I use Wal-Mart Lacquer thinner. Buy it in the gallon can and pour it into a smaller can. Then I use a bottle with an eye dropper cap for squirting it into the back of my airbrush to flush it clean. Usually 3 droppers full. That works for me anyway.
 

wheeler1963

Aurora & Portland Owner
Dean, if you can find a bottle like this, it's most helpful. I fill that up with thinner, then squirt it right down the back of my airbrush after I've taken the bottle off. Keep spraying it through until it comes out clear in an old rag. Then I un-screw the bottle top and squirt some through that also. Makes clean-up a bit easier.

100_1928.jpg
 

deanej

Member
How about water based paints. I know it cleans up with water, but do you put anything special in the way of soap or something in the cleanup water?
 

NH Mike

CEO & Wheel Cleaner
I have a Paasche model H that I bought in 1975. I also have an internal mix Paasche that I use once in a while. Have always used laquer thinner to clean them. Initailly I run the thinner through them as Jerome describes followed by disassembly and soaking in thinner at the end of a paint session before blowing them dry and putting them back together ready for the next use. No problems even with the O rings and packing rings. Not sure how a less quality unit with non metal parts would hold up.

Almost forgot to mention that I only use enamels and laquers so can't help with water based paints although the Windex sounds good.
 
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Espeefan

Well-Known Member
I also use lacquer thinner for clean up. It's universal. It will clean anything enamel or lacquer. If it's too volatile for you, Xylene will also work, I have thinned Scalecoat 1 and 2 as well as Floquil products with Xylene for years with no negative results, ever. The hobby thinner business (and paint for that matter) cinsists of putting small quantities of things in small bottles and charging high prices for them. Scalecoat thinner is mostly Xylene anyway, but spend your money how you please.

Windex is a good cleaner for most waterbased paints. I use the ammonia free variety. if you use the blue stuff, rinse out your airbrush with water after the windex, as the ammonia will eventually attack the chrome plating.

A word of caution on lacquer thinner. O rings briefly exposed to it will not be a problem. O rings soaked in it will swell and cause you problems. Make sure your gun has teflon seals. (most do)

There is also a product called Createx Airbrush Restorer. You can periodically soak your METAL airbrush parts in it and you'll be surprised at the gunk you get out of it. Keep O rings and teflon parts clear of it though. It's even re-usable.
 

deanej

Member
Thanks Alan. I didn't know about the ammonia issue. Useful caution.

Where do you buy Xylene?

The reason I'm not too smart is that I started spraying Floquil back in 1965 and have killed a number of my brain cells.

Deane
 

Espeefan

Well-Known Member
Home Depot, Lowe's, Wal-Mart, whatever you have in the way of that lind of store. Xylol also works exactly the same. I use them both, depending on what's in stock
 

deanej

Member
I have all of those nearby. I just haven't ever purchased those products before. Usually plain old lacquer thinner at Ace Hardware. Problem is, it's so potent and I have developed allergy to thinners. I still use them, but moving away from them when possible makes sense for me.

While I got my first Paasche Air Brush in 1965, and used it vigorously for years, I've been away from modeling for about 10 years. As I resurrect my interest, I'm having to learn about the trends in materials all over again.

I do mostly Union Pacific, and Scalecoat has always had the best color match for UP Amour Yellow, making it more challenging to find something to replace Scalecoat.
 

Espeefan

Well-Known Member
Are you using a good quality respirator? One that is rated for the vapors this stuff puts off? They make a huge difference. I use one plus a vented booth, and vapors stay pretty well under control.

I use Scalecoat 1 and 2 myself mostly, so I know where you're coming from. Their NYC Light Gray and SP Lark Dark Gray work the best for UP/SP/Pullman Pool service TTG cars. Haven't found anything better myself. I have moved to acrylics for weathering and a few other things, but we tend to stick with what we learned on, I think.
 

Cjcrescent

Master Mechanic
Most enamel/lacquer thinners, esp the old Dio-sol for Floquil and Scalecoat I & II, are actually a mixture of two thinners, Xylol and Tuolol. These are also known as Xylene and Tuolene. Scalecoat was basically a mixture of 55% Tuolol, 35% Xylol and 10% other chemicals. While Dio-sol was almost the opposite with more Xylol than Tuolol.

Nowadays I just use Xylol for both, as Tuolol is getting very hard to find around here.

I got my first Passche brush in 1973, and still have it and use it.
 

Charles Smiley

cspmovies
QUOTING Deane,

"The reason I'm not too smart is that I started spraying Floquil back in 1965 and have killed a number of my brain cells."

I hear you on that! The Floquil thinner was even more toxic until recent years. I would always stop once the vision started blurring too much. :D

But then again in grammer school we used to roll mercury in our hands to make pennys look like they were the color of dimes.
 

deanej

Member
QUOTING Deane,

"The reason I'm not too smart is that I started spraying Floquil back in 1965 and have killed a number of my brain cells."

I hear you on that! The Floquil thinner was even more toxic until recent years. I would always stop once the vision started blurring too much. :D

But then again in grammer school we used to roll mercury in our hands to make pennys look like they were the color of dimes.
Yup, I did the mercury thing also.
 

NH Mike

CEO & Wheel Cleaner
Yup, I did the mercury thing also.
Ha ha that brought back memories! Along with playing with mercury and Dio Sol fumes we also had model airplane dope and Duco cement. When not involved with some indoor hobby project we'd be out in the woods playing army or cowboys and bad guys with loaded bb guns. :eek:
How anyone lived past the age of 14 back then is still a mystery. :confused:
 

Charles Smiley

cspmovies
"How anyone lived past the age of 14 back then is still a mystery"

So true and so many ways to go.
I remember this junk sold in lead tubes for kids to make their own balloons. It was a liquid that smelled like old model airplane fuel mixed with some rubbery stuff. You had to blow into a pipe with this stuff in the bowl to make balloons.

Wooohooo! And it got you kinda tipsy at the same time. Anyone remember that stuff from the 1950s?

Of course it was a time when "leading doctors recommended Camel Cigarettes too. And race car drivers didn't wear seat belts because they believed it was better to be "thrown free of a bad accident". Yeah - right....:p

That's why my Model RR is stuck in 1955. Good times.
 

Dollie's Dad

Gandy Dancer
I was in the Navy, and I slept in the top bunk on a WWII-era ship. About 6" from my nose was a big steam pipe wrapped in asbestos.

And yes, I do remember the goop in the tubes you could make balloons from.
 




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