Would Like Help ID'ing a Railroad

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txstars15

New Member
I'm planning a new N layout set in the eastern US so as to take advantage of mountains, tunnels, bridges, and be able to incorporate perhaps coal, steel or sawmill as industries.

Problem is, I want to ID a prototype RR from that region, circa 1960's-1970's or so, diesel, freight and passenger, but have no clues. I'm told the Chesapeake & Ohio and the Clinchfield RR ran there, but I have no pics of what the engines or rolling stock looked like.

So, my request is two-fold:
1) identify a suitable RR for that part of the country
2) come up with pics of locos and cars so I'll know what to look for when buying

Any suggestions are greatly appreciated! I just hate being a newbie!!
 

RexHea

RAIL BENDER
Hi txstars15 and welcome. Don't worry about being a "Newbie"; most everyone is a Newbie in some area of modeling.

I believe your search for info would get more results if you could be more specific to the region of interest. The Eastern U.S. is a huge area when you think of all the many railroad companies that operate or operated there. From your description, you can be anywhere from New York to Georgia. Areas like West Virginia, Pa, Tenn, Ohio, N. Carolina, Kentucky, W. Maryland, all come to mind from what you are looking at for industry and scenery.

Also, are you looking at freelancing your layout or will you model a prototypical railway and area.

Example: I freelance model the Southern Appalachians, but try to stay with railroads that operated in this area during my 1950's era. The towns and operations are fictional giving me latitude in how I arrange things.
 

txstars15

New Member
More Info

Hi txstars15 and welcome. Don't worry about being a "Newbie"; most everyone is a Newbie in some area of modeling.

I believe your search for info would get more results if you could be more specific to the region of interest. The Eastern U.S. is a huge area when you think of all the many railroad companies that operate or operated there. From your description, you can be anywhere from New York to Georgia. Areas like West Virginia, Pa, Tenn, Ohio, N. Carolina, Kentucky, W. Maryland, all come to mind from what you are looking at for industry and scenery.

Also, are you looking at freelancing your layout or will you model a prototypical railway and area.

Example: I freelance model the Southern Appalachians, but try to stay with railroads that operated in this area during my 1950's era. The towns and operations are fictional giving me latitude in how I arrange things.
You're quite right. Considering the terrain look I'm after, I guess SE US is more sepcific. TN, KY, NC, SC, somewhere along those areas.
 

OldGettysk

Running the MC & Buffalo
Hi TXstars15 and welcome, This place might help you identify some old railroads and what the locomotives looked like "Fallen Flag Railroad Pictures".com have fun with your N scale layout
 

jbaakko

Diesel Detail Freak
Hummm, well I'm sure there's someone who can get you some info. I'd try but I'm not well versed on Eastern roads.
 

txstars15

New Member
Fallen Flag website???

Hi Paul,
I could not find a website for fallenflagrailroadpictures.com Where did you come across that?
 

RCH

Been Nothin' Since Frisco

RexHea

RAIL BENDER
If you are interesting in modeling circa 1980's, then I agree with Ryan in that the Norfolk Southern would be a good choice. Formed in 1982 and with the mergers/acquisitions of many railroads, you can have a lot of different flags running on your layout. (Just say they haven't been to the paint shop yet.;) :D ) Also, as you will see by this map, their territory is huge.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norfolk_Southern
 

RCH

Been Nothin' Since Frisco
The 1980s is the time I model the NS, but I was actually referring to N&W as my choice for the era specified. In fact, probably the coolest thing about the N&W for the time is that they were among the last railroads to dieselize their fleet. I think they may have even continued operating steam into the early '60s. When the finally did buy diesels, they bought geeps - loads of geeps. The Wabash and the Virginian gave them some cool equipment, and while I'm not sure how involved they got with the Erie Lackawanna, there are some possibilities for adding some of EL's unique diesels to the mix.

Then again, don't ask me. If I had the money, I'd model every railroad! Clinchfield, EL, N&W, Southern, Mopac, Katy, BN, ATSF, SP....
 

RexHea

RAIL BENDER
Oops! My eyes got crossed, Ryan. I see the N&W now. Ha! Ha!

Yeah, Txstars15 there are a lot off good choices to make for this area. Plenty of equipment to choose from, lots of history, and beautiful scenery.
 

RCH

Been Nothin' Since Frisco
You know, a good resource for researching this stuff is wikipedia.org. Lots of info there and much of it links together. I'm having a blast reading it right now.
 

OldGettysk

Running the MC & Buffalo
Rex is right NS runs quite a large territory the even have tackage up here in Buffalo , New York and into Canada !!
 




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