Which Air Brush Set?

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A

ajroland

Guest
I want to purchase an air brush set to be used in detailing my model railroad. In the past all I've ever used to paint models was spray cans. Which air brush set would you suggest for a novice painter that wants to learn the art?
 

SpaceMouse

Fun Lover
I've not used one, but if I were to start over, I would use a single action, internal mix air-brush.

Right now I've got a double action internal mix and it is just too complicated for what I use it for.

If you have a chance watch the Dream Plan Build DVD #1 for a really nice discussion of the differences.
 

Trucula

Drum Driver
Easiest to use is a single action and works well for learning...If you are just painting over all thats the way to go...a double action works buy pressing the trigger and you get just air...paint is added when you pull the trigger to you while pushing down...takes alittle getting use to...Its great for air drying and area so it dosen't run or custom work where you want to push the paint and make "splashes" something you don't need in modeling unless your doing custom paint details...a single action is simular to a paint can with some adjustments...and a dual action has fine detail that you can spray down to a fine line...tho working on HO scale,whats fine on a t-shirt/auto is a large line on scale models...I bought a package deal off eBay from airbrushcity.com, great people...fast shippment and lots of supplies...I got 4 airbrushes and a compressor,all hoses, fittings, air dryer, blowgun, tire pump, needle valves just like this one on there now. for about 200 bucks...check out their site too
http://cgi.ebay.com/Airbrush-Compre...3QQihZ016QQcategoryZ28111QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
 

SpaceMouse

Fun Lover
Bob,

My understanding of the single-action internal-mix was there was a high degree of adjustment,just not on the fly like the double action.
 

Trucula

Drum Driver
Bob,

My understanding of the single-action internal-mix was there was a high degree of adjustment,just not on the fly like the double action.
(From airbrushcity.com)

The SINGLE ACTION airbrush has a trigger that controls the airflow only. A pre-set amount of liquid is sprayed when the trigger is depressed. You can only adjust the amount of fluid released by turning the liquid cap on the paint tip located at the front of the airbrush.

The DUAL ACTION airbrush has a trigger which controls both air and color by pressing down for air and back for color. This trigger allows the artist to change the range of opacity and the width of the line easily, without stopping the spraying motion.

INTERNAL MIX means the air and paint mix inside the airbrush. Air and paint come together inside the head assembly to produce a thoroughly atomized fine point spray pattern.

EXTERNAL MIX means the air and paint mix outside the airbrush. Air and paint come together outside the head, or fluid assembly. External mix airbrushes produce a larger point spray pattern than internal mix airbrushes.

The GRAVITY FEED AIRBRUSH is the choice of professionals for fine art in almost every Airbrushing operation. The Gravity feed requires much less air pressure to operate, as the paint is supplied to the air mix chamber by gravity, thus eliminating the high air pressures required to siphon up the paint materials from paint jars siphon feed units use. The finest of lines are acquired from an airbrush by using the lowest possible air pressure settings, thus making gravity feeds much superior for fine detail. This also makes the airbrush easier to clean, and you well have much less clogging problems. Most fine Gravity Feeds are Dual Action, Internal Mix.
 
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sushob

Entrepreneurial Teen
I have two double-action internal mix Badger air brushes that are sitting on the shelf collecting dust. (I actually thought they were single action until I just took them out of the box to double check :eek: ). There's nothing wrong with them (new old stock), but I already have two brushes and I doubt I'll ever use them.

They are both Model 100 brushes. One has an extra fine tip and one has a large tip. They're each in a hard plastic case and come with an extra needle, hanger, color cup, and wrench.

If you're interested in either, let me know. I'm not sure what they're worth, so make an offer (I'm easy to bargain with ;) ). I'd rather see them go to use than sit here for who knows how many more years :)
 

Cjcrescent

Master Mechanic
Bob;
That 100XF is a truely fine brush. Double action, internal mix. It really sprays an extra fine line. "Problem" is that it will not spray acrylics without them being extremely thin, which means poor initial coverage. Acrylics can and will clog the tip very easily. (Ask me how I know!)
I've always used my XF with solvent based paints, particularly for detail painting, weathering, etc and it works extremely well. For general painting of base coats, main colors on locos etc, I've always used a Passche H model. Its now over 35 yrs old and I've only had to get 2 other tips and a gasket for it.

I would recommend starting with a single action, external mix brush, similiar to a Passche H or an internal, single action like the basic Badger 150, (think thats the number). After getting to where it can be used to get consistent, repeatable results, then consider a finer double action. You will have situations where the single action will work better than the double and visa-versa. If you're expecting to do a lot of painting, you can't have any one type of brush that will work best in every situation. Its like having regular paint brushes in more than one size.
 

Espeefan

Well-Known Member
First airbrush

Hi guys, CJ!

For beginners: CJ nailed it with the Paasche H. Easy to use & clean. comes with three tips, fine meduim and large. For an internal mix single action, the Badger 200. The new ones work well with acrylics. The internal passages are larger than the old model 200. It seems the pigments in acrylics are not ground as fine as those in solvent based paints. This from a fellow at the Badger booth at IHobby Expo in Chicago last year.

These are good for structures, boxcars, flat uniform surfaces.

The internal mix brushes are good for weathering, finer detail, and more precise control. Irregular surfaces, such as steam locomotive boilers, and so forth. It is a different set of reflexes, but you'll get used to it. I hated mine the first time I used it, and now it's the first one I grab. The Paasche Millenium is nice, or the Badger Anthem. Thayer Chandler is also very good.

As with anything else, start simple.
 

HaggisKennedy

Coal Shoveler
I've got a Badger 350, which is pretty much a single action entry level airbrush. I use it to paint micro-armor and buildings, but it's best for base coating and such. Any kind of finer detail work, it's not the one.

My friends use Badger 150s, they can paint 3-color camouflage on 1/300 scale microarmor with them, so you should be able to paint N-scale and above. Though we usually use enamels, and not much in the acrylic realm.

I'm thinking about moving to a Paasche, for my HO-scale stuff.... Need to be good with acrylics, since that's what I normally paint with these days. I'm leery of the previous comments regarding the 100XFs with acrylics...., they're used for illustrators and nail artists. I didn't think they'd use enamels for that sort of thing.... I might be interested....

Kennedy
 

Cjcrescent

Master Mechanic
I've got a Badger 350, which is pretty much a single action entry level airbrush. I use it to paint micro-armor and buildings, but it's best for base coating and such. Any kind of finer detail work, it's not the one.

My friends use Badger 150s, they can paint 3-color camouflage on 1/300 scale microarmor with them, so you should be able to paint N-scale and above. Though we usually use enamels, and not much in the acrylic realm.

I'm thinking about moving to a Paasche, for my HO-scale stuff.... Need to be good with acrylics, since that's what I normally paint with these days. I'm leery of the previous comments regarding the 100XFs with acrylics...., they're used for illustrators and nail artists. I didn't think they'd use enamels for that sort of thing.... I might be interested....

Kennedy
Haggis;

If you're thinking about an airbrush for acrylics, any internal mix brush except for the extra fine tipped ones, would work better than an external mix brush. Passche's V series would be an excellant choice for acrylics, as is the Badger 200 series. As Alan stated, the Thayer & Chandler is good, as is the Iwata. But these are more expensive than the Passche and Badgers.

The 100XF's paint the enamels and lacquers extremely well. They just should thinned more than when using solvent based paint in a regular airbrush. Since the pigment "particles" in solvent based paints are alot smaller than the long chained polymers of acrylics, the solvent type paints go thru the 100XF's very easily without clogging the tip.
 
A

ajroland

Guest
Paint type

Do most of you use acrylics for model railroad painting? To start with I'll be painting structures mostly. I doubt I'll try weathering rail cars for awhile. I can see doing that at some point in the distant future. This is why the model rr hobby is so great. There is always some project to work on.
 

Cjcrescent

Master Mechanic
Do most of you use acrylics for model railroad painting?
Personally AJ, I avoid them like the plague.:eek:

Actually, its more of an experience based bias. I've used enamels, lacquers and inks for so long that I really can't get the hang of acrylics.:) I'm sure that for most folks they work well, but for me, PPPPHHHHT!:rolleyes:
 




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