What's the preferred airbrush set-up???

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fcwilt

Active Member
The Badger was a popular name in the 80s, not an expert but the big deal was double action. I used a Binks single action for many years. The Binks was as capable as the Badger at painting and producing the same effects as the double action tool.

At that time there were very few air brushes. I believe those were the only two that could be called pro models. Testors had a plastic deal sold as a Hobby airbrush, close but no cigars.

Can you kindly explain, how a Badger brush is any easier to clean between color changes. Once I became comfortable using an air brush. I found cleaning to be nothing more than filling a paint cup with lacquer thinner, spray until clean.

BTW, did end up with a Badger it was given to me and the cleaning of it seemed a tad more involved. Certainly has more parts to get gummed up, and care must be taken to not bend the needle when cleaning. Not knocking the brush, just saying.

Compressor choice: OP

You want a compressor that has a storage tank. One big enough so you do not have air pulsing as it runs, at the brush when painting.

Just food for thought

greg
I was only speaking of the Badger 155 versus the 105. The 155, being a "siphon" style it is not quite as easy to clean as the "gravity" 105 - the siphon tube can get clogged and it adds a step to cleaning - no such part in the 105.

Generally I do not have to take my 105 apart to clean it - as you say - just run some cleaner through it.

I have both the 105 and the 155 but I use the 105 most of the time.

Frederick
 

wombat457

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Instead of working out what airbrush you want and then doing the same for a compressor, why not by a set where you get the airbrush and compressor together? It could end up being cheaper (over-all) and you will definitely get brush - compressor compatibility.

Take a look here for some ideas:

http://www.tcpglobal.com/
 

steelwheels

Member
I was only speaking of the Badger 155 versus the 105. The 155, being a "siphon" style it is not quite as easy to clean as the "gravity" 105 - the siphon tube can get clogged and it adds a step to cleaning - no such part in the 105.

Generally I do not have to take my 105 apart to clean it - as you say - just run some cleaner through it.

I have both the 105 and the 155 but I use the 105 most of the time.

Frederick

Frederick,

I see said the blind man, air brush with a "siphon" ? Ok, you are saying the bottle hanging under the brush, is the siphon style.

The Binks has that, the vent hole in the cap would plug with paint . Never thought of that as a siphon, but it defiantly is that.

greg
 
Instead of working out what airbrush you want and then doing the same for a compressor, why not by a set where you get the airbrush and compressor together? It could end up being cheaper (over-all) and you will definitely get brush - compressor compatibility.

Take a look here for some ideas:

http://www.tcpglobal.com/

wombat457

Thanks for the link. I stumbled across that site a short while previously. Seems they carry alot of Master Airbrush products, one of the brands I'm told to avoid. With a limited budget I'm not sure I can afford to step up and spend up to $1k usd on a quality airbrush set-up at this time. We'll see.
Right now I need to start planning the layout.
 

fcwilt

Active Member
wombat457

Thanks for the link. I stumbled across that site a short while previously. Seems they carry alot of Master Airbrush products, one of the brands I'm told to avoid. With a limited budget I'm not sure I can afford to step up and spend up to $1k usd on a quality airbrush set-up at this time. We'll see.
Right now I need to start planning the layout.
You don't need to speed that kind of money. Here is a top notch setup for under $400. It includes everything you need except paint - air brushes (2), air hose, quick disconnects, compressor (with tank, gauge, pressure adjust and moisture filter).

https://www.amazon.com/BADGER-105-1...TF8&qid=1522429953&sr=1-1&keywords=badger+155

https://www.amazon.com/Badger-Air-B...=1522429877&sr=8-2&keywords=badger+compressor

You will be happy with that setup.

Frederick
 
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wombat457

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Amtrakking,

No problem, you have to work within a budget. I'm just not sure where the $1k figure came from though. You can get a complete system, Iwata HP-CS airbrush, Compressor, Paints, etc etc etc for $302 (US) from TCPGlobal:

http://www.tcpglobal.com/ABD-KIT-4207T-MASTER.html#.Wr6FLy7wa9I

I'm not trying to talk you into anything just letting you know that you don't have to spend an arm and a leg for a decent starter system.
 

Red Oak & Western

Active Member
Both products Frederick linked to are fine. That's a good price for the 2 brush set. I have both cup and bottle airbrushes; either is a good choice. I personally feel the bottle is a little easier to learn with. It has one less feature to worry about. With a cup, you always have to be aware of the angle at which you are holding the brush. That is not a problem once you have mastered air and paint flow, but it can be a problem for some beginners.

I also prefer a compressor with a tank. Its more of a sound issue with me, but some airbrushers are bothered by the pulsing of direct compressors when doing fine detail work. He's right about the cost as well. $300 to $400 will get you a top notch setup. A Badger 150 set (single brush) can be purchased for just about $100. A Porter-Cable 6 gallon compressor is currently under $100 at Lowes/Home Depot. A 0-50 psi regulator runs about $25. That will get you painting. From there, you can spend as much or a little as you wish on accessories. And remember: both the airbrush and compressor will last a lifetime is properly cared for. My 1st 150 is over 30, my compressor is over 25. Build your accessory kit a few pieces at a time as you determine a need for them. Quick disconnects are nice, but if you only have one airbrush, they aren't really needed. If they come in the kit, great, if they don't, that's fine as well. You will need cleaning supplies. And again, I second the recommendation for a model paint mixer ($10 to $15). Add paint and have fun.

Edit: Just read Tony's post - (he posted while I was typing). That kit will work as well as assembling your our kit. The Iwata is an excellent airbrush. The rest is okay and covers what you need to get started. (But you'll still want a mixer :cool: )
 
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fcwilt

Active Member
Hi,

Just to avoid any confusion that compressor I linked to has a tank though it is certainly not 6 gallons. I have not noticed any pulsing. And it is a good deal quieter than the compressors I have for my pneumatic tools.

Frederick
 
Amtrakking,

No problem, you have to work within a budget. I'm just not sure where the $1k figure came from though. You can get a complete system, Iwata HP-CS airbrush, Compressor, Paints, etc etc etc for $302 (US) from TCPGlobal:

http://www.tcpglobal.com/ABD-KIT-4207T-MASTER.html#.Wr6FLy7wa9I

I'm not trying to talk you into anything just letting you know that you don't have to spend an arm and a leg for a decent starter system.

Your advice is well taken. I appreciate the information I will check into it shortly.
 
Both products Frederick linked to are fine. That's a good price for the 2 brush set. I have both cup and bottle airbrushes; either is a good choice. I personally feel the bottle is a little easier to learn with. It has one less feature to worry about. With a cup, you always have to be aware of the angle at which you are holding the brush. That is not a problem once you have mastered air and paint flow, but it can be a problem for some beginners.

I also prefer a compressor with a tank. Its more of a sound issue with me, but some airbrushers are bothered by the pulsing of direct compressors when doing fine detail work. He's right about the cost as well. $300 to $400 will get you a top notch setup. A Badger 150 set (single brush) can be purchased for just about $100. A Porter-Cable 6 gallon compressor is currently under $100 at Lowes/Home Depot. A 0-50 psi regulator runs about $25. That will get you painting. From there, you can spend as much or a little as you wish on accessories. And remember: both the airbrush and compressor will last a lifetime is properly cared for. My 1st 150 is over 30, my compressor is over 25. Build your accessory kit a few pieces at a time as you determine a need for them. Quick disconnects are nice, but if you only have one airbrush, they aren't really needed. If they come in the kit, great, if they don't, that's fine as well. You will need cleaning supplies. And again, I second the recommendation for a model paint mixer ($10 to $15). Add paint and have fun.

Edit: Just read Tony's post - (he posted while I was typing). That kit will work as well as assembling your our kit. The Iwata is an excellent airbrush. The rest is okay and covers what you need to get started. (But you'll still want a mixer :cool: )
starting looking at those guns. Good look out!! Will let you know how it goes.
 
Checking Amazon I can get the following:

]BADGER 105-155BGF Two Airbrush 105 and 155 Set , a compressor w/ 3ltr tank, cleaning kit and 3way splitter with cables and quick releases for $430.......how does that sound???
 

steelwheels

Member
I am stockpiling toools & supplies to build my layout and have been looking at airbrushes, spray guns and airbrush kits and am interested in what others are using.


Look, if you are just starting out, I would suggest that you start the bench work and get a lay out going. An airbrush is a luxury that is one of the last things to get into. Loads of great weathering can be accomplished with washes, thinned paint. Applied with a brush, a lot of modeling can be accomplished with simple hand tools, paint from a bottle.

You will get more use from a set of tweezers model building that an air brush. In the early stages of the development of the empire. Down the road and if you start to paint engines and other high end paint and detailed projects. Then bring in the airbrush, I've see modelers fill up an inner tube, hook the airline to the valve stem an airbrush away. I worked on a layout, 12 X 14 L shape for easy two years before I bought an airbrush.

My point to the OP is to prioritize or buy tools as needed. To complete a current model or track work project. Stockpiling tools before a need, one could end up with many things that never leave the drawer or box stored in.

A good idea when purchased, but as the skills of the molder get refined. Even if there is a tool made for some process one could be working with. That tool may not be necessary.

I've been around for a while, and I can tell you this. There is or will be a tool made for anything, anyone can think of. The name Ronco comes to mind as an example, get my drift.

400 - 1K for an airbrush set up that you may not need at this time is a waste of $$$... later not so much cause the layout, and skill level will be ready to make the transition.

Cheers,
greg
 
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wombat457

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Checking Amazon I can get the following:

]BADGER 105-155BGF Two Airbrush 105 and 155 Set , a compressor w/ 3ltr tank, cleaning kit and 3way splitter with cables and quick releases for $430.......how does that sound???
I have no idea about Badger Airbrushes, in terms of quality or what model does what, but the price doesn't sound bad for an entry level airbrush system.
 

Red Oak & Western

Active Member
King,

That's not a bad deal for 2 Badger airbrushes. They are fine quality and you WILL be pleased with them. I know you can trust their operation, so that eliminates one variable in your quest to learn airbrushing.

Greg,

I setup my airbrush system long before I was able to even think about starting a layout. I built, painted, and weathered a lot of rolling stock and buildings to run/place on the layout of the club I belonged to. It was nearly 16 years before I had space to begin a layout (and I continued modeling all that time). And I still spend more time with the airbrush than I do working on the layout. Its what I enjoy doing. So it really depends on where the OP's interests lie. He asked about setting an airbrush system. We've just been trying to provide guidance to a new user.
 

wombat457

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Not wishing to be confrontational or start an argument about the value of an airbrush but I have to agree with Kevin as well. My layout is in the making but not in place by any means. I see nothing wrong with getting prepared if your budget allows it, after all, prices will go only go in one direction.

My airbrush has been used for all manner of things in the hobby, painting kits, using it for washes on my layout and now trains. My airbrush isn't confined to the hobby either. I use it to repaint garden ornaments and other hobby non related things.

While an airbrush might not be an essential item, I wouldn't consider it a luxury either especially, if like me, your not that great at hand painting things. Personally, I see an airbrush as an aide just like radius templates, their not necessary either but sure do make work easier and quicker.

What it all boils down to is what Amtrakking can afford, what he wants and what he see's and feels is important. As Kevin said, he didn't ask if an airbrush was worth while, he asked what airbrush system he should consider. That suggests to me that he has made his mind to up get one.
 

fcwilt

Active Member
I have no idea about Badger Airbrushes, in terms of quality or what model does what, but the price doesn't sound bad for an entry level airbrush system.
Badger makes fine air brushes here in the USA. They have been around since 1964. I would not call the 105 or 155 an entry level airbrush. I've tried many different brands - they are all gone except for the Badgers.

Currently I have three 105s and two 155s - fitted with different size nozzles.

Badger owns Thayer and Chandler.

Here is an interesting site for airbrush users: https://sites.google.com/site/donsairbrushtips/home

Frederick
 

wombat457

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Frederick,

As I mentioned, I know nothing about Badger Airbrushes. The price suggested an entry level system, if it isn't then it seems as though what he is looking at is very good value indeed and worth having.
 

fcwilt

Active Member
Frederick,

As I mentioned, I know nothing about Badger Airbrushes. The price suggested an entry level system, if it isn't then it seems as though what he is looking at is very good value indeed and worth having.
Did you get a chance to visit that site I referenced?

Frederick
 

steelwheels

Member
@ Kevin & Tony

No worries, I am just adding some practical thinking regarding tools. The air brush being the main topic here. It's a big investment for a beginner, especially if the empire is at the bench work phase. Is it really necessary at that point?

Who knows, maybe he uses a spray gun to paint cars everyday. Now seeking info as to what is the best brush, specifically designed for use in this hobby. I'm also assuming the OP is an individual building his own empire and wants to get it up and run trains.

I'm all all about recommending a product found, to be of good quality that produces good reliable results.

I caution anyone starting out to be focused on what they need at the time and place they find themselves at. With that in mind their purchases will have an immediate value and usefulness.

Don't put the cart before the horse, is the point.

greg
 




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