Want to start weathering models

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Seems to me I got a pack that had maybe 10 sticks that went from black thru the grays to white and another 10 stick pack that had browns and reds and oranges and lite greens in it. The green does good if you have a damp area and need that nice moldy look.
 

grande man

Bonafied Grande Nut
What is used here for the dirt and rust?
It's chalk I purchased at the LHS and artist pastels from Hobby Lobby (Derwent brand). The dark charcoal pastels work well for the soot. Sorry I'm so late getting back to this thread.
 
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It's chalk I purchased at the LHS and artist pastels from Hobby Lobby (Derwent brand). The dark charcoal pastels work well for the soot. Sorry I'm so late getting back to this thread.
What colors are they? I picked up some today, there are 12 colors, and they go from black to white (greys in the middle)

Also, that looks like water or something you are using on your brush? Did you use this on the "soot" too?
 

grande man

Bonafied Grande Nut
What colors are they? I picked up some today, there are 12 colors, and they go from black to white (greys in the middle)

Also, that looks like water or something you are using on your brush? Did you use this on the "soot" too?

You really only need a few basic colors. Black or dark charcoal for the soot, various shades of brown for the dirt and lighter tans/greys for dust/ballast dust, and rust for, well, rust.

I apply the chalk (pastels) dry for the basic result you see earlier in the thread but have used them wet on limited occasions. The "wet water" (drop of dishwashing detergent in pint or so of water) is only used to remove excess "soot" for a streaked effect around ribs, etc with the paper towel.

This is a simple technique. Don't be afraid to try variations on an inexpensive piece of rolling stock for practice. You'll be amazed how easy it is to produce a nice looking model quickly. Soon, you'll get the results you're after and it'll be second nature to you.
 
You really only need a few basic colors. Black or dark charcoal for the soot, various shades of brown for the dirt and lighter tans/greys for dust/ballast dust, and rust for, well, rust.

I apply the chalk (pastels) dry for the basic result you see earlier in the thread but have used them wet on limited occasions. The "wet water" (drop of dishwashing detergent in pint or so of water) is only used to remove excess "soot" for a streaked effect around ribs, etc with the paper towel.

This is a simple technique. Don't be afraid to try variations on an inexpensive piece of rolling stock for practice. You'll be amazed how easy it is to produce a nice looking model quickly. Soon, you'll get the results you're after and it'll be second nature to you.

Thanks, this is my first time trying it, so I found a 5$ rolling stock to play with =)

I just want to make sure I get the right things. I got "Soft Pastels" and they feel like chaulk. Then I took some scissors and scraped it into a big pile of black dust, and then used my brush in that to brush the rolling stock?

Thanks!
 

grande man

Bonafied Grande Nut
Thanks, this is my first time trying it, so I found a 5$ rolling stock to play with =)

I just want to make sure I get the right things. I got "Soft Pastels" and they feel like chaulk. Then I took some scissors and scraped it into a big pile of black dust, and then used my brush in that to brush the rolling stock?

Thanks!
It sounds like you're on the right track. You'll have to vary the colors somewhat depending on the base color of the model you're working with, but that experience comes quick. For example, it wouldn't make much since to "soot" a black hopper. In that case you'd probably Dull Cote the model first, then apply lighter tan colored chalk carefully and forego the wet water and paper towel treatment.

Have fun and post pics!
 

grande man

Bonafied Grande Nut
I prefer to let the Dull Cote hold the rust (and other lighter colors) on without overspraying it. If you do decide to Dull Cote after applying light colors, their intensity will be reduced considerably.
 

grande man

Bonafied Grande Nut
ahhh okie thanks. Is there a way to stop it from being messy when I pick up the part I colored then? thanks!
The Dull Cote "holds" the chalk very well. Messy models have never been a problem for us. Give it a try. I think you'll find out the mess is a non issue. :)
 

wongsing

Member
even a light coat of dull coat will hold the chalk very well, and although it will fade light colors, the less dull coat you use the better! I had to use several coats of pastel to get it right!

-Rich
 




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