Want to start weathering models

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chrismoore93

Central Phoenix Railroad
:) Well, as Christmas approaches, another year has gone by that my model railroad has not gone up. While my house was recently retiled and carpeted, I think the time has come. I have a final spot in my bedroom for a nice little switching railroad that should allow me to start learning the basics of building a model railroad. So, I was looking at my models the other day and saw that, they were a bit shiny. Now me being someone that likes to be prototypical wants to start weathering them. I was just wondering what methods would be easiest for me being 13, or if you know of any that really work well? I would like to be working on something to occupy my time while I start my trackplan.
Thanks,
Chris
 

jbaakko

Diesel Detail Freak
There's many ways. I'd start with powders, and maybe buy one of those easy weathering washes. Powders are very forgiving though. Hopefully Brakie can provide some insight into his weathering process, I want to test it out on my beat up hoppers.
 

grande man

Bonafied Grande Nut
Hey Chris. Weathering is a lot of fun. I'm a believer in chalk (artist pastels) and genuine Testors Dull Cote. While the results won't be up to the level of some weathering specialists who use advanced technique, the models will look great and a fleet of weathered units is within timely reach.

If you have a Hobby Lobby nearby, you should be able to get the pastels in a kit with six 1/4" square x 3" long sticks for under $10.

Here's a repost of my weathering method. Be sure to remove any windows (or tape them) to keep the Dull Cote off unless you want a dirty trailing unit in a loco consist.

Keep in mind, I'm no expert, and there's usually a right way, a wrong way, and Grande Man's way. :D

The "victim" and supplies.
113512628.jpg


The first step with lighter colored models is to "soot" them with black chalk. Cover the whole model. I prefer an angled brush to work chalk into all the nooks and cranies.
113512618.jpg


Using a paper towel dampened with "wet water" (small amount of detergent, used in scenery work), clean excess soot using a verticle wiping motion. The idea is to leave streaks where they would accumulate on the real thing such as around structure that's above flush.
113512620.jpg


At this point, coat the model with Dull Cote. Since the wheels have been removed, try to keep the spray out of the truck journals. Dull Cote "sets" the black previously added, while at the same time, toning it down somewhat. It also creates a surface that "grabs" lighter colored chalk soon to be added.
113512614.jpg


Using the same brush, add dirt and rust. Since we model the West, little rust is used. Lighter grays can also be added to the lower areas where ballast dust would accumulate on the prototype.
113512626.jpg


We use Floquil Rail Brown to paint wheels. Be sure to keep paint off the bearing area and treads. The trucks are dry brushed with Rail Brown and chalk highlights are added.
113512623.jpg



Presto! The finished hopper at CF&I's Split Rock Mine #4.
210476109.jpg
 
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chrismoore93

Central Phoenix Railroad
Thanks for the tips guys. I really enjoyed watching the weathering technique you used on the car Eric. It looks like a fairly easy technique that I should be able to use. As I have some cars from the East, I will have to learn how to rust cars as well.
Thanks,
Chris
 

enjineerbill

Avid People Watcher
Well Eric, I had never sen that thread before, thank's for reposting it for us. That hopper turned out very nice, the rivets seem to just pop out now!

Johnny
 

grande man

Bonafied Grande Nut
The cool thing about chalk and Dull Cote is that anyone can get a decent looking weathered effect with a little practice. It's cheap, easy and fast. All three of those factors are important if you have a whole fleet that needs "dirt". It's amazing what just a coat of Dull Coat will do for a shiny plastic model. :)
 

MLW

Active Member
grande man , that's the best tutorial I have seen and explained. Well done!
 

grande man

Bonafied Grande Nut
grande man , that's the best tutorial I have seen and explained. Well done!
Thanks. That's from a pretty old post...

Here's another model given the same treatment. It's a little more advanced in that it's a lighter base color with more detail, so dark high lights had to be added selectively instead of covering the entire unit from the beginning. Still, it's just a modification of the same principles. Total time spent on it was probably 30 minutes, but that was only because the windows required tape before the Dull Cote was sprayed.

Before.
210476124.jpg


After.
210476120.jpg


210476115.jpg
 

swizzly

New Member
I also use chalk and Alkahol to weather my Locos and Cars.



 
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Hey Grande Man...Do you happen to have a pic of the box (or even know what brand) those pastels you have are? (the cubed boxes and the sticks?)

I could not find any at my local hobby store, but I did find some oil pastels (thicker than a crayon, thats it).

We do have a Hobby Lobby, but its a bit aways from here, I dont really want to drive out there not knowing exactally what im looking for.

I noticed you have the little case (quarter? sized) that you are using as the "Soot". Can you just use the oil pastel (crayon) one, rub a brush against that and brush the side of the car, with the same results? Thanks!

(these are the ones I purchased)

http://www.dickblick.com/zz200/69/


20069-2409-3ww-l.jpg
 
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Am sure Grande will answer, however I found some chalks at Michaels which is our local crafts store. Maybe you have one close to you.
 
Am sure Grande will answer, however I found some chalks at Michaels which is our local crafts store. Maybe you have one close to you.

Actually, thats where I got the pastels in my post above lol.

When you mean chaulk, is it the same chaulk like you write on a schoolboard with? Do you just crush them up?
 
What I found was what I assume is artist chalk in square sticks kinda like chalkboard stuff. I ground it up and put it in old contact lens cases.
 
What I found was what I assume is artist chalk in square sticks kinda like chalkboard stuff. I ground it up and put it in old contact lens cases.


Ahhhh okie then. Looks like ill be headed back there for the 3rd day in a row lol, hopefully they have some, I really dont remember...I wrote down some things from what Grande posted above, and I guess I forgot to write down chaulk and just purchased regular oil pastels =( Is there certain colors that is needed?

Im asking because what is this color/type that he is using below out of the little case?

113512626.jpg
 




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