Train Shed Layout,... Lighting

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beiland

Well-Known Member
I believe I need a couple of LED tube lights for my 'train shed' (12x16) double deck layout, but I am totally a novice at this LED lighting subject.

I'm pretty sure I will make use of LED strip lighting to light the lower shelf/decks (underside of upper deck), ...but I was unsure what to do about the upper deck lighting? Perhaps just ceiling lights like old florescent ones, but newer LED versions. Perhaps a row of single/dual tube fixtures (LED ones) down the center of the room, or two rows of fixtures down the ceiling at either side of center.

Whats the latest in 'LED tubes', and minimal fixture size, and best pricing???





 

Frank

Member
Personally, I'd get fixtures that direct the light upwards so that they bounce off the ceiling. It makes the lighting less harsh and somewhat more pleasant.

I'm seeing LED shop lights in increments of 4'. That should be more than short enough for your purposes. I see Amazon has like 6 of them for a hundred. But, I'd go with indirect light for the best effect and possibly smallish spot lights on various portions of the track if you want to really get the most out of the layout's appearance, light makes all the difference. It's hard to get excited about a layout that's under even, harsh lighting.

If you really want to maximize the life of the layout, there's LEDs that allow you to tune the color. Which can be great if you want to simulate evening and night lighting. But, probably overkill.
 

beiland

Well-Known Member
Your low overhead and relative lack of insulation (yes, I see some, but this is still a steel building) suggests that LED strip lighting may be what works best for you. It' takes up very little space compared to track lighting, which usually hangs down 4" to 6" from where t's mounted. LED strip lights are even thinner than a tube-type fixture (~2") since they can be surface mounted and are maybe 0.25" tall. Heat can be a big issue and LEDs put out virtually none.

Plus, LED strip lights can usually be surface hung on the ceiling without the need for a contractor, permit, or code inspection by the property owner or resident. LED strip lights can also be repositioned easily if the initial install needs adjustment.

I believe that idea of strip lighting on the ceiling was an idea I initially considered, and now that I rethink it, is one I should reconsider.

It was only recently as I installed the masonite sheets over the interior insulation that I realized how dark it was going to be inside the shed until I got it painted a lighter color and installed some sort of lighting to use during 'benchwork' construction, etc.

Perhaps I should just install some surplus fluorescent tube lights as a temp solution until I decide on a more permenant solution?

But I would really like to determine my needs for wiring up whatever lighting I will eventually use, and get it installed before I close up that center portion of the 'rafters'. The LED strip lighting would be realitively easy to 'hang', .....and I think easy to wire up,...probably easier than fluorescent type fixtures?

Aren't the LED's somewhat 'directional' in their lighting,...such that I would have to be concerned with their locations mounted approx 5 ft over the top deck?

Also it is not as though I am building this layout inside a home, and thus being concernned about 'home like appearances' such as track lighting, recessed lighting, etc..

This is just a train "shed'.
 

beiland

Well-Known Member
8 LED shop lites for $62

8 four-foot long LED lights, and linkable, all for $62

These are the latest 'shop style' lites I found at Amazon,...

(Pack of 8) LED T5 Integrated Single Fixture 4FT,20W,2200lm,6500K (Super Bright White),Utility led Shop Light, LED Ceiling light and Under Cabinet Light
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B076FQ15R6/ref=ox_sc_act_title_2?smid=A1KZKP85O3COJ&psc=1

That's less than $10 per lite, and they are linkable,..




I have some concerns about the 6500K spec?

I'm thinking I could link 3 of these down either of the two sides of my 15 foot long ceiling in my shed,...for 'room' lighting?

Might even be usable for under upper shelf lighting?
 

KB02

Well-Known Member
looks pretty good. It will be interesting to see how thy light up your space.
 

beiland

Well-Known Member
As I had mentioned above I was concerned about the intensity (6500K) of that white light of those fixtures I had found above. Now I have found another similar fixture than rates at 4000K,....and is selling for 6 for $49.

I've ordered these and we will see how they turn out.

This one you referenced is interesting,....guess I just did not look too deeply in their site.
https://www.amazon.com/Barrina-Integrated-Fixture-Utility-electric/dp/B01HBT3BVM

I'm ordering these today and do some experimenting. If they should happen to put out too little light for what I was looking for, then I might just string up a row of the bright whites next to them as has been mentioned in this subject thread,...two 'shades of white'

I'm going to run a string of 3 of these 4 foot lights down each side of the shed's ceiling,....just about where the edge of that masonite is up there. I'll likely mount them on some sort of long board that can be tilted over so as to light up the the lower deck and upper deck, and concurrently keep the light from shinning directly into operators eyes standing in the middle of the room. That center light fixture on the fan will likely be removed.




 

beiland

Well-Known Member
As I had mentioned above I was concerned about the intensity (6500K) of that white light of those fixtures I had found above. Now I have found another similar fixture than rates at 4000K,....and is selling for 6 for $49.

I've ordered these and we will see how they turn out.
Quick update. I found that the 4000k lights were not bright enough to utilize as the 'ceiling mounted lites'. But it does appear as though they will work fine mounted under the upper deck to light up that portion of the lower deck.

I suspect I will be ordering the 6500K lites for the ceiling.
 

Iron Horseman

Well-Known Member
Quick update. I found that the 4000k lights were not bright enough to utilize as the 'ceiling mounted lites'. But it does appear as though they will work fine mounted under the upper deck to light up that portion of the lower deck.

I suspect I will be ordering the 6500K lites for the ceiling.
That is interesting. What is the lumen output of the 4000k bulbs? I believe you can find bulbs with higher lumens without going up in the color spectrum. I have found that over 4200k is too blue for my taste. I know they call it "white" but I see blue.
 

Y3a

Stuck in the 1930's
Me and my dad lost our first big time layout that was in a shed. We had a roof leak that damaged track, scenery, and turnouts, and ruined the carpet. Just a heads up.
 

beiland

Well-Known Member
I got a very nice shed by Handi-House. They have built a lot of these for the southern states, and most all that I've inspected appear to hold up real well.
 

beiland

Well-Known Member
That is interesting. What is the lumen output of the 4000K bulbs? I believe you can find bulbs with higher lumens without going up in the color spectrum. I have found that over 4200K is too blue for my taste. I know they call it "white" but I see blue.
I ended up getting some of those 6500K strips, and some 5000K strips. I'm now trying to determine which lights i am going to use on each level of my layout,...upper deck, main deck 18" under that, the staging deck 8"under that.

I initially mounted the 4000K lights on the ceiling of the shed to light up that upper deck. I am now reconsidering putting them down in the staging area as they just are not as bright as I might wish to try to light up that upper deck from their ceiling mounting. One thing I did like about them is you could look at then directly without as much 'glare/intensity' as the higher K ones present.

original 4000K units
1597760136643.jpeg



the 5000K units
1597760242518.jpeg


Here are the 3 types laid next to one another,...6500K, then 5000K, then 4000K
1597760353331.jpeg


then contrasting 6500K with 4000K
1597760418297.jpeg




The 6500 ones definitely have a noticeable blue tint.

Doesn't the upper portion of the sky have a noticeable blue tint??
 

beiland

Well-Known Member
Angle mounting & Visor suppliment

I am also debating as to whether to angle those upper ceiling ones with respect to the sloping ceiling,...and whether to providing any view blocking screen/visor to them that might inhibit direct eye contact with the 'bulb' itself.
 

beiland

Well-Known Member
...from another forum...
Valences....are a great idea. Yes, I think it's a good idea to hide the fixture, so you only see the light falling on the scene itself.

6500K does seem a little high. I am using daylight fluorescents at about 5000K. I do wish LED tech had been a few years more more advanced, as I would prefer something like the system you have (or else the low-voltage strip LEDs) instead of the traditional bulky rectangular fixtures, with 120V wiring in conduit.
But if I use a valence/visor on those ceiling ones,.... then I wonder about my 'room lighting' for the aisles etc??
 

beiland

Well-Known Member
Solid or see-thru valence

I was looking for a solid piece of material that might be attached to the side of that LED light fixture,...then had a second thought, why not a semi-transparent one? Here is my 'tracing paper' valence.




But I would worry about that being a fire hazard.
What other thin, transparent material might I use??...maybe some very thin metallic mesh material, or maybe spray coat (fire-proof) that paper,...?
 

beiland

Well-Known Member
Wow, I think I just found my valence material. Its a huge piece of thin transparent plastic that is salvaged out of those big screen TV's.


Turns out we had a fellow here at our local flea market that use to take a lot of these big screen TV's apart to salvage various items. In many cases there were these large sheets of plastic inside (I don't know their function), and in many cases he had no use for this big stockpile of plastic sheets. I on the other hand kind of figured I might find some use for them down the road.


I had forgotten all about them lying under one of my beds, just waiting to be rediscovered. I have at least 5 different types/thicknesses. I'll get a photo soon. I figured they can be cut into strips and maybe double tape adhered to one side of the LED light fixture where the paper valence is now.
 

beiland

Well-Known Member
I like the low heat output AND the low energy usage. I've actually left some of those lights on overnight to discourage any pest activity (perhaps just perceived?). They are also very light weight to hang.
 

beiland

Well-Known Member
Super Bright vs Daylight Glow

As I have mentioned I have some of these LED lights in both 4000K (daylight glow) and 6500K (super bright). And I have some 2' long ones in addition to the majority 4' long ones.

So yesterday I was playing with how I might distribute them around the layout. In particular I was trying to intermix some of the short ones (6500K) with the long ones (4000K),..down in the corner over my coal mine scene and lumber pond. That's when the color differences jumped out at me! I have to admit to being a little color blind, so perhaps that is why I had not picked up on this significant difference before. WOW, those 6500K units put out a blueish color that just made things on the deck seemed 'washed out' . While the brighter units would seem to offer more light, it was a light that looked more washed out.

Even though they were brighter, they didn't provide as good a light as the 4000K units. I'm going to have to give serious considerations to replacing those 6500K units with the 4000K units. I may even have to consider replacing the 5000K units I purchased with 4000K units.
 




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