The Rad Roster Challenge #2

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The idea of this challenge is to develop a proper roster for the railroad described.

One can consider power needs, manufacturer, past history, aesthetics, economy, economics, marketing appeal, and even preference of the General Manager or President. The answer is a simple list of the era appropriate locomotives, quantity, and their assignments. The list is then followed by a brief description of why these locomotives were chosen.

Due to the comment in the prior challenge about being unfamiliar with the era, the challenge is basically the same as the prior. It is simply upgraded to the 2nd Generation Diesel era.

Railroad - The Midwest Link Line
The date is 1977. Geography is plains, max grade .04% and never more than 1/4 mile at a time. The railroad has just emerged from receivership brought on largely due to the truck competition of the 1960s. In receivership it just purchased a small segment of track from a Rock Island abandonment. The "new" track allows it to make a second connection with a more prosperous (healthy) class one. With the Rock Island out of the picture, it is now a trunk line which happens to be the only connection between the two Class 1 railroads for 200 miles in either direction. It is in the enviable position opposite of most railroads during the mid 1970s, business is booming. It is getting enough interchange pass-through traffic for two through trains a day in each direction (20-60 cars each). The pass-through traffic is mostly merchandise with a few regional drags thrown in. No through unit trains of coal or TOF (TOF will pass through but not in large units). Occasionally it will get an Amtrak reroute, but Amtrak provides their own power. They might need a loaner in the case of a failure.

The railroad now has its own interchange yard at each end of the system. There is locomotive servicing and storage at each end but there is only one locomotive shop.

The railroad is the sole provider of services in six small towns between the two large roads. There are the normal 1970s mid-west industries in almost each of these towns (grain elevator, cement plants, junk yard, gravel pit, and lumber yard). Also on the line is a farm implement and auto dealership (large enough to get rail shipments), a couple petroleum loading stations, a refinery, a limestone quarry, and a chemical (fertilizer) plant. With depressed agricultural prices and inflation spiraling these industries only generate enough traffic for a tri-weekly local in each direction. There is one major industry (a water bed manufacturer) that generates enough traffic for one train a day in each direction. This manufacturer is nearly in the center of the line and far enough away from the "main" to almost be considered a branch.

Name that roster.
 

dingoix

Certified CGW expert
10 new GP38-2s for the thru / interchange trains
4 used GP35s for local freights
4 used GP7s for local freight and yard switching
 

emt49

internets worst speller
8 new SD40-2 for the thru / interchange trains the SD40-2 was significantly more reliable and economical than the higher-powered unitS of this time

6 used GP38 for local small 4 axel for small industral work/and can be added to interchange incase of brake down

5 used alco RS11 for yard work / local back up incase of brake down
 
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HaggisKennedy

Coal Shoveler
From the cheapskate perspective, I'd go with GEs. U30B/Cs for mainline, endcab switchers for yards, and maybe U23-28Bs for locals.

I pick GEs because they were in competition with the Big Dawg EMD at the time, and you might get a better deal with GEs than wait to pay a full price for EMDs....

One could also get used locos/hand-me-downs (first gens) for local work as well. Just depends on how cheap you want to go!

Kennedy
 

Brakie

Member
Based on real short lines/regionals here is my choices
Yard work,transfer duty and urban locals.GP9s
Road freights and main line locals..GP38s and GP40s.


Why all 4 axle units? Simply because of financial reasons including the price of use 4 axle unit over a 6 axle unit,a one locomotive builder parts supply,fuel economy and etc..After all we still need to buy new and use freight cars and have money to maintain both fleets.
 

dingoix

Certified CGW expert
I agree on all 4 axle units.

emt, SD40-2s seem like overkill, as a pair of GP38-2s could handle a 60 car train.
 

emt49

internets worst speller
dingoix said:
I agree on all 4 axle units.

emt, SD40-2s seem like overkill, as a pair of GP38-2s could handle a 60 car train.

I dont dissagree but i love the big 6 axle units like the SD40 :rolleyes:


but it was also said that "business is booming" so i was kinda doing a lil planning ahead it may be over kill now but how about later
 
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