Station look

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Maxitrains

Member
Could you kindly suggest me, or post pictures of what a 1950/60's US station should look like ( not a very big one, I don't have enough space ), at the moment I have this one, but I don't think it fits with US style buildings and especially 50 / 60s



Kindly post ideas and mostly pictures so I can search for the right type of station.

Thanks
 
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Myowngod

Pennsy Tuscan Red Blood
I find the Governments "Library of Congress" site very useful. I find all kinds of building on that site.

Here's the link to a search of "train station" . LOC site

You can go to the "New Search" tab at the bottom and type in any thing you want... you'll probably find it.
 
Unless you are modeling a prototype I dont think it would matter. There are many kinds of stations in the US. Some in use and some abandoned. My brother lived in a house next to an old train station that was turned into a house. It was built in the early 1900s I believe. There is no passenger service in Roanoke and the early 1900s station is still here tho gutted by fire and the mid 1900s is now a museum. Pick one that you like. Tom
 

Maxitrains

Member
Well I will stick with my actual station then, if I happen to come across something more close the the US style stations maybe I will change it.

About the link you gave me Myowngod, id couldn't load. I will try it again another time, maybe its overloaded.
 

Myowngod

Pennsy Tuscan Red Blood
About the link you gave me Myowngod, id couldn't load. I will try it again another time, maybe its overloaded.
Sorry try this one. LOC site

Hopefully it works. I didn't cut it down at all. This is from a search I have saved in my favorites. It's of a bridge I'm going to build on the layout my Dad and I are working on. It's the Green Lane Bridge just outside of Philadelphia, PA.
 

mburn16

New Member
Well, before the Amtrak takeover (and even after), there really is no description of what a "standard" train station would look like in the U.S. Because of the many different railroad companies operating, and the differences in size, traffic capacity, and local arcitecture, there is no true design for a "U.S. train station in the 50s/60s". They ranged from massive stations (such as those in NY or Chicago) to large stations (like the one in Detroit), to small stations or even simple cement platforms.

The first question is already answered - your time period. Now you need to answer the question "what region of the country" - and then look for pictures from that area. A station in Michigan, for example, could look very different from a station in Arizona.
 

Maxitrains

Member
Well my main station location should be Ashville according tot he plan I started on, the one on top I do not bother much, as I placed a Cargo depot, but if I find a small station, maybe I'll place one near it too.
 

HaggisKennedy

Coal Shoveler
Your best bet is to get a copy of the Walthers catalog. It's the size of a small phone book, and has a lot of stuff in it. Including European buildings (Pola, Faller, etc.). It's a resource directory as much as a catalog. Many of us use it to see what's out there.

It's kinda heavy, I usually get them via book rate if I order one via mail order. Dunno how much it would cost to send one to Malta. I think the retail price is $17.00 or so.

Kennedy
 

Maxitrains

Member
:S, I guess I have to keep on looking out on e-bay, what's the use of getting a catalogue, when the shipping will cost me twice its price :S

I will be looking for some buildings similar to this

5063_1.jpg


I think that this type of buildings will fit in my layout. I will also be looking for some stations and maybe an engine shop.

if anyone comes along any kindly PMs me

Thanks.
 

HaggisKennedy

Coal Shoveler
From a practical standpoint, it might cost twice as much to ship, but the fact that it'll be a reference-type of catalog will pay for itself later on. Sorta like back in the day when they were selling encyclopedia sets. That up-front cost was high, but you can use it for a long time. An investment.

You don't have to buy a new one every year, or even buy anything FROM Walthers. But, for ideas and what's out there, it's very useful.

Kennedy
 

HaggisKennedy

Coal Shoveler
As far as the buildings are concerned, the one on the right seems to be more prototypical to me. The main thing that seems odd to me about the other one is that stone foundation; for a city building, to me, that doesn't look that familiar. At least not that stone pattern. I would say that in towns, foundations would be brick, concrete, or cinder block by the time of the transition era.

Other than that, it's a nice building.

Kennedy
 




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