Reversing loop

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jacon12

Member
I'm trying to work in a way.... somewhere... to have a reversing loop to turn the train around and go the way I came, when I need to. With my limited experience the only place I see that I might can do it is from point A to somewhere in the vicinity of B..

The arrows indicate the usually direction of travel and the numbers are elevation. Assuming I can get a reversing section along here I really need a straight section in it to run sidings off for my business/industries within that area.
Do you see any other places a reversing loop would work? Or any other way to reverse the train. Wyes eat up so much space, but would that be a better alternative?
The table/benchwork in that area is 4'x8' and the track radius is 22". The largest loco to travel it would be a 2-6-6-4 articulated steamer.
Thanks,
Jarrell
 
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HaggisKennedy

Coal Shoveler
That's probably the best place, since it's level, and you really don't want trains twisting around curves of different elevations. You also have to remember that the reverse section has to be big enough for the longest train you're going to run. Otherwise, you run into the obvious problem!

Sidings could be a problem, I don't really know because I personally don't do illustrated trackplans well. My method is to sketch out what I want, then lay down temporary trackwork. Run trains, and see where the problems will lie. What looks good and workable on paper may not be all that good in real life. You actually need to operate first to really know.

Having said that, I'd put a turnout on the first section of track after the curves at A and B. The diverging should be a continuation of the curves; you're looking at #6 switches. Connect the two ends in however manner, then figure out where you can put in a straight section for the siding. I'd say it'd be a curved, stub siding.

Upon further reflection, think also about cascading turnouts to get more sidings (like a yard ladder). Also, the diverging path could be the path that connects to the opposite end of the reverse loop. The main thing you want to avoid is any "S" curves.

Kennedy
 

Fergmiester

M.E.S.S. Maker
I would come in just North of the River as this may give you more room for big curves.

If direction wasn't such a concern

How about this: Assuming up is North either come off at A or B and join up with the double track north of the river.

or

Come off at A or B and star going down cross the river under the double track and join into the siding to the West of the Timber Mill. This second alternative will not give you a Reverse loop.

or

Combine the two above concepts.

I have an "S" Curve and it does look good but I've put in a bit of a straight (gentle curve) in the middle of the "S". Failing to do this has caused some rather ugly occurances


If you haven't figured it out I love grades and convuluted designs.

Fergie
 
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CBCNSfan

Registered Member
Staff member
guess there was a couple posts while I was butchering your drawing :D
Anyway this is pretty much what the lads said. Entrance to a siding can be any where you have a straight section. Try this out on your drawing program the grey blobs are locations where it may be possible to put a siding. For the "S" curve make the straight section as long as possible, I don't believe the drop of 1 inch from 3 to 2 would be a problem. Just an idea that may not work :confused:

Cheers Willis
 

NZRMac

In Training Down Under.
Remember if you have one reverse loop and you use it your train is stuck going that way unless you reverse (backwards) your train thru the loop. Two loops solves that wee problem!!

Ken.
 

jacon12

Member
I appreciate the suggestions everybody and especially the 'new' graphic illustrations.
I have the problem of the line dropping from 3 3/4th inch to 3 inches from the bridge at the cross over, heading 'north' around the curve. So coming off there with a turnout is out of my modeling skill. I have the same problem along the back left most track the one going north and south, it drops 1 inch in about 6 to 8 feet. I guess I could shorten that distance with no problem so I could be back level quicker.
The one thing I had NOT thought of was what Ken said, once the train is reversed I've got a problem unless I put in another reverse area somewhere.
Hmmmm....
Anyway, ya'll have given me a lot to think about and for that I thank you.
Jarrell
Pres & CEO M&M Railroad :)
 

phatpony

Member
The difference in elevations are your biggest hurdles. You could actually put another one in on the south loop where the yard and passenger siding is. Just use a curved turnout on the innermost track where it leads to the passenger terminal. This puts you back into the yard. Then the whole loop can act as a reversing loop as far as power is concerned. If you are using DCC, or DC for that matter, your reversing section only needs to be as long as your longest powered train, in otherwords, if you don't have any lit passenger cars or a lit caboose, the reversing section only needs to be as long as your locomotive. Using the whole loop can accomodate a long train.

Glenn
 

NZRMac

In Training Down Under.
I found the metal wheels on my cars tripped the DCC reverser, so I had to have the loop longer than the train.

Ken.
 

HaggisKennedy

Coal Shoveler
Yeah, you don't want a change in elevation right after a switch, especially a diverging route. That's just asking for trouble. Maybe not on the uphill, but downhill for sure. The problem is that if you put in a level section, the remaining becomes a steep grade. Better to stay pretty level.

Kennedy
 

jacon12

Member
As much as I like different (track) elevations for visual interest, the inclines start to eat up possible areas for sidings etc. In the diagram above, the passenger siding is 2 inches lower than the adjacent yard. The incline starts just after the right most turnout and climbs around and up to the 2 inch level, leveling off right about the "2 inch' designation on the plan. I have NO room for the planned passenger station and at this point I'm thinking about abandoning it all together. Ditto for reversing loops.
Thanks for the help fellas.
Jarrell
 

Rico

BN Modeller
Could you put a turnout "North" of the passenger siding that heads into a tunnel by your drill track and loops under A & B? This would add a staging area when not in use.
Also, if you're using conventional DC power have you considered using a bridge rectifier to reverse your train in the loop? Works pretty sweet, you just tickle the reverse on your throttle while the train is in motion.
That's my 2 cents worth. (about 1.5 US)
 

jacon12

Member
Rico said:
Could you put a turnout "North" of the passenger siding that heads into a tunnel by your drill track and loops under A & B? This would add a staging area when not in use.
Also, if you're using conventional DC power have you considered using a bridge rectifier to reverse your train in the loop? Works pretty sweet, you just tickle the reverse on your throttle while the train is in motion.
That's my 2 cents worth. (about 1.5 US)
Rico, that's an idea and I appreciate the suggestion. I'll have to look into it and see if it's feasible, it just might be.
Jarrell
 




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