NEW Dockside structure and Oil tanks

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Steve B

Firefighter
These are the new products from Scalescene's and they are very cheap, you buy the downloadable "kit" and print it out as many times as you like,,, you want a huge dockside berth or a tank farm you can do it for peanuts ;)

Dockside berth

Oil tank This kit footprint is 10" square including the bund

Enjoy,,,,, :D
 
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jbaakko

Diesel Detail Freak
Nice! But, if I remember my eduction right, block walls are banned from being used for berms in the US.
 

RexHea

RAIL BENDER
Interesting! Hmmm!
What do you do, download and then you can print off as many as you want from the single download?
 

Steve B

Firefighter
Rex Yes, purchase - download - use as many times as you can, it's a great way to add loads of structures for next to no outlay

NEW This is the newest FREE DOWNLOAD it's a small store building, very nice as well if properly constructed, this is the H.O. scale model

There are also two more new structures available,
1. factory boiler house chimney
2. Dito - plus boiler house
HERE
 

Steve B

Firefighter
Take a look at THIS It's the factory kit in H.O. scale, you can add height, width, depth to make it fit anywhere, and you also get the inside walls decorated, ceilings, floor and for only $5.99 you won't get a better bargain than this
 

Joe Daddy

C & SF, my obsession
Take a look at THIS It's the factory kit in H.O. scale, you can add height, width, depth to make it fit anywhere, and you also get the inside walls decorated, ceilings, floor and for only $5.99 you won't get a better bargain than this
Steve,

Sorry, but I have a bucket of cold water in my hands. About 18 months ago, I purchased Evan Design software to print stuff like this.
http://www.modeltrainsoftware.com/articles.html

I thought I'd found the way to build retaining walls, portals, buildings, virtually anything for little cost. I tried portals, ugh, they looked like paper portals, and actually MAKING hydrocal portals was easier and they looked a hundred times better!

How about doing a review of your product in the product review section.

Oh, the retaining walls were really nice, until the paper started pealing from the masonite. I'd really like to have avoided this false start, I spent a lot of time that I have essentially had to rework because of this rabbit trail.

Just my 2 cents, I hope your results are more satisfactory.
Joe
 

Steve B

Firefighter
I like the look of the web site Joe, I have bought several kit's to build but i have not started any yet, i did a small waiting shelter for a station with no problems, printing the stuff on the correct card is half the battle and glueing it together correctly is the other half. They recomend spraying the finnished article with a clear varnish to hold the colours in, not tried this yet though,
 

RexHea

RAIL BENDER
Steve, if you ever try one of these tanks, please let me know the outcome. I am curious as to how it would work by using a PVC pipe for the liner.

Josh, reinforced and sealed concrete is commonly used for smaller tank farm berms (including the bottom), particularly at chemical plants. They must be a size large enough to contain a complete and catastrophic failure of the tank and prevent any spillage from seeping into immediate and surrounding soil. EPA is very strict on this. Years ago when I worked at a chemical plant, we had a hydrochloric acid, fiberglass storage tank (40k gal.), fail and split open down its side. The concrete berm held thanks to an acid resistant liner, but it was a hell of a mess in the immediate area. The limestone aggregate around the berm neutralized the splash over, but all the piping and pump paint was ruined. Dang, did it ever stink!
 

jbaakko

Diesel Detail Freak
Josh, reinforced and sealed concrete is commonly used for smaller tank farm berms (including the bottom), particularly at chemical plants. They must be a size large enough to contain a complete and catastrophic failure of the tank and prevent any spillage from seeping into immediate and surrounding soil. EPA is very strict on this. Years ago when I worked at a chemical plant, we had a hydrochloric acid, fiberglass storage tank (40k gal.), fail and split open down its side. The concrete berm held thanks to an acid resistant liner, but it was a hell of a mess in the immediate area. The limestone aggregate around the berm neutralized the splash over, but all the piping and pump paint was ruined. Dang, did it ever stink!
Yeah, but are we talking poured concrete, or concrete block? As far as I remember concrete, or any block for that matter, was banned way back in the late 60's or early 70's. I can't seem to find any info, I'll see if some of our books at work say...
 

RexHea

RAIL BENDER
This was poured concrete, but each was lined or painted with a material that protected the concrete from what ever was stored, if necessary. Some of the stuff at my (herbicide) plant was deadly dangerous and you wouldn't want it absorbed. Instead, the berms had drains that led to a lined concrete lagoon (holding tank) to be neutralized. In the case I mentioned, much of the berm had to be repaired as some of the HCL still managed to eat away at the concrete. As a note: I have also seen concrete block used, then covered with some kind of plaster looking stuff to seal it all up. When done, it looked like solid concrete. This was in late 70's.

Also, out at Hunt Oil Refinery, the big storage tanks have what appears to be dirt berms, but I can see several concrete berms around the process area tanks. Now, this may only be, because of being grandfathered for a change. EPA makes changes all the time, but will grandfather an existing installation. I have no idea what they require now. Maybe this could be found on their web site.:)
 
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jbaakko

Diesel Detail Freak
I tried checking the EPA's website, but got not good hits. Its an interesting topic though, if you notice, not many model railroaders even put berms, and some that do are definitely too small!

The berms around our large above ground tanks on base are earthen, with black plastic looking tarps. But we only hold jet fuel in them. The smaller 20K & 30K horizontal tanks have no berm, however they are double walled.
 

RexHea

RAIL BENDER
Yeah, it has been good. I was hoping that a chemical engineer would see this and answer for us. Not a big deal and you are right that many modelers don't worry about it. It may be because of space, but IMHO they are missing some very realistic detail. When I get back to work on my refinery, I certainly will have berms in place. (Don't want a mess on the floor.:D :D)
 

Joe Daddy

C & SF, my obsession
There was a great write up on the Refinery at Augusta Kansas in last months Scale Rails. There were a lot of pictures too! That magazine has really proved to make the NMRA dues a bargain.
Joe
 

RexHea

RAIL BENDER
Yeah Joe, I have heard about the article. Wouldn't you know that I dropped the magazine portion of my dues this year. I have a few contacts and may be able to borrow their copy.
 




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