Manual Turnout Control by Cable

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beiland

Well-Known Member
Sullivan Gold-N-Cable



I guess it might be said that this is Sullivan's answer to a very small diameter, and very flexible system. It also uses a .032" inner cable that is a multistrand cable rather than a solid rod,...thus the name. Its outer diameter is slightly less at approx .06X"
http://sullivanproducts.com/product/032-brass-plated-ss-very-flexible/
Twice as expensive as the Du-Bro size for size,.....not so high on my list.

Oops I missed this solid rod version of theirs,....
http://sullivanproducts.com/product/solid-steel-rod/
"S587 – .025 High Tensile Rating Music Wire, Z-Bend, 36″ length, 12″ Minimum Radius, 1 set per package"
$3.74 each
 

GeeTee

Well-Known Member
Teflon tubing and piano wire. Make up whatever length you want . Metal wire clamps to hold it or nylon tywraps. Everything is available from multiple vendors .

Dirt Cheap Alternative : Teflon tubing and 304 stainless 7x7 1/16 wire rope (100ft spools are $10-$15) use standard electrical ring terminals to crimp on the ends
 

beiland

Well-Known Member
This has turned into a bit more of a problem that I foresaw. The cabling not so much, there is a lot of options out there.

It is the end fitting that is the problem area,...connecting the cable to the vertical post/wire/ whatever that moves the turnout's throw bar. Mine needs to reach up thru the 3/4" plywood deck and the approx 1/4" cork roadbed to the throwout bar,....1" plus tall. You would think a stiff piece of piano wire with a 90 degree bend in it would do the job?

But wait a minute, that upper joint (wire within a hole) needs to be the slightest bit 'loose fitting' so as not to bind. Then if the bottom is not dead on tight in the vertical direction you get a little too much slop in the situation,...particularly working against the spring action of the stock Peco turnout.

I'm glad I thought I should mock this up full scale as I have found faults I never anticipated,...back to the drawing board.
 

GeeTee

Well-Known Member
This has turned into a bit more of a problem that I foresaw. The cabling not so much, there is a lot of options out there.

It is the end fitting that is the problem area,...connecting the cable to the vertical post/wire/ whatever that moves the turnout's throw bar. Mine needs to reach up thru the 3/4" plywood deck and the approx 1/4" cork roadbed to the throwout bar,....1" plus tall. You would think a stiff piece of piano wire with a 90 degree bend in it would do the job?

But wait a minute, that upper joint (wire within a hole) needs to be the slightest bit 'loose fitting' so as not to bind. Then if the bottom is not dead on tight in the vertical direction you get a little too much slop in the situation,...particularly working against the spring action of the stock Peco turnout.

I'm glad I thought I should mock this up full scale as I have found faults I never anticipated,...back to the drawing board.

For cabling or servoing a switch its usually necessary to a spring in the mechanical connection , a "vee" in the piano wire or a loop, otherwise you inevitably end up with to much or to little throw.

To hold the piano wire under the turnout you'd need to pass it through something like a staple or cable clamp. But even with that on a Peco you'll have binding with stock action.



Over the years , I have found that to do anything with a Peco other than manual, its best to remove the stock action. But then I dont usually "remote" a switch unless I can't reach it or its to inconvenient. That means hidden yards and mainlines , Also if your using a walk-around throttle you have less need to remote switches vs. a power pack because your not "tethered" to the packs location all the time .

Well the hurricane finally brought some rain , nice little torrent , we needed it.
 

beiland

Well-Known Member
Slide Switch on its Side



I'm looking more closely at this basic idea of a slide switch mounted on its side with its plastic handle sticking out its side,....

Turnout control 1.jpg


turnout control2.jpg









I like the idea of that vertical piano wire anchored firmly in the plastic handle. It likely would not require any 'hook' on its top end to secure its position in that existing thrownbar of the Peco turnout, ...and if attached outside of the center hole of the throwbar, it could have a slight hook that could be passed up thru that oval hole in the deck.
What I do NOT like about these applications is the method of attaching the cable control (or rod) to the switch handles. All of the examples above require that control cable to line DIRECTLY up with throw bar's direction. I would like to have some leeway to have that control cable come into the handle at some slight angles. I believe if the receptive hole for that cable was drilled like this (up-down) then this might be possible,...coat hanger control rod


Don't understand why 2 of those images don't show up ??
 
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beiland

Well-Known Member
Manual Control of Single Crossovers



my latest project,..

In my original planning I had been going to utilize a couple of double crossovers by Shinohara that I had picked up at a train show a number of years ago. As I got to studying them, and discussing them here on the forum, plus running some experiments with them, I began to look for alternatives.

Turns out I had room (length enough) to utilize 2 pairs of single crossovers rather than the doubles. I also discovered that I could make very effective single crossovers using 2 Peco large size turnouts back-to-back. Here is a comparison,....Shino Dbl on left, then Peco large pair, Peco med pair, Peco sm pair,....

I ran experiments with those Peco large pairs and was very satisfied.


So where I was going to have a dbl-crossover, I will now have 2 single crossovers consisting of 4 large size Peco turnouts.


My dilemma now is how to manually control (from a distance) each 2 Peco turnouts of the crossover with a single control rod/whatever.,..some sort of linkage situation.
 

beiland

Well-Known Member
Linkage Idea


Here is what I have in mind for a linkage to coordinate the operation of 2 Peco turnouts together. It's basically a stiff piece of metal strip that would be a little bit longer than the distance between the holes in those Peco throw bars . It would have two vertical 'post' of music wire welded at that exact distance between the throwbar holes, and they would be long enough to reach up thru the plywood deck (and roadbed) to operate the turnouts when the metal strip was rotated slightly. The rotation center of the metal strip would be the exact center between those vertical post.


The rotating metal strip would bear against the underside of the plywood deck, perhaps against a very thin plastic shim for friction purposes. It would only need a single central screw mounted into the plywood deck to rotate about, and it would only need one push rod attachment to operate its rotation,...one control rod / cable to activate 2 crossover turnouts simultaneously.















(that vertical pin would be centered in that metal strip & firmly anchored)
 




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