Bar Mills Tylick Tool - Time for the Insanity

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twforeman

Certified Great Northern Nut
Did some more work while I was thinking about the flashing. I painted and installed the beams for the hoists and the porch support and roof. I also installed the stairs.

Then I decided that I was far enough along that I could put some gravel down all around, so I just spent some time doing that. Now I have to wait for the glue to dry and can see where I need to add more and then start weathering it.

Here are some shots of the current state.








It's starting to look close to done, but there are a bunch of small details yet and then more weathering.
 
Did some more work while I was thinking about the flashing. I painted and installed the beams for the hoists and the porch support and roof. I also installed the stairs.

Then I decided that I was far enough along that I could put some gravel down all around, so I just spent some time doing that. Now I have to wait for the glue to dry and can see where I need to add more and then start weathering it.

Here are some shots of the current state.








It's starting to look close to done, but there are a bunch of small details yet and then more weathering.
Amazing job sir!
 

twforeman

Certified Great Northern Nut
I've been painting all those detail parts and they are mostly ready for some dull coat, so I should have photos tomorrow.

But I got the crane mounted today.


I also added more rust and some tar to the roofs. I was inspired by the rust pattern on a steel roof I drove past the other day.


 

twforeman

Certified Great Northern Nut
Here are all the little details that I painted up.


I'm especially happy with the way this pile of junk came out.


The tires didn't make it into that photo, but here they are piled up at a building. I've been thinking about what this building should be and maybe it's an automotive parts distributor.


Here's one pile of sacks at the freight building.


Here's the other one at the glue factory.
 

twforeman

Certified Great Northern Nut
The concrete roads (narrow city streets) are 2-3/4", the asphalt roads are 3-1/4". They also have shoulders on each side that are about 3/4" wide.

It surprised me how much room semi-scale roads take up. I don't have any on-street parking or sidewalks, which would add a lot more width.
 

santafewillie

Same Ol' Buzzard
Many thanks! I've been trying to think what I'd need to allot for road width.
I make mine more narrow than the prototype, approximately 9 scale feet per lane. Parking lanes are 8'. Saves room and doesn't really look bad. Makes a two lane road (18') with no shoulders or parking not quite 2.5". Most HO scale vehicles are between 6.5' for cars and 8' for trucks. Since my HO scale people don't walk around much, the closer clearance doesn't really matter to them.
 

Greg@mnrr

Section Hand
I double checked my info on Wisconsin roadways and here's the poop....

wisconsinmunicipallaw.com/?p=401
In Wisconsin, by law, the width of a road is presumed to be 66 feet, unless there is evidence to the contrary. It does not matter how the road came into being. In fact, although this is often misunderstood by landowners and sometimes by municipal officials, the historical “ownership” of the underlying land is quite often irrelevant to most ....

On one of our Central Wisconsin properties it has an easement road along one of the land's borders. The easement is 66 feet wide. Most of the easement is wooded. The land's official survey and county records show that we owned to the middle of the easement, but it can't be improved.

Greg
 

Greg@mnrr

Section Hand
Thanks Greg. I was thinking about bodging some tar on there. I agree that the flashing is a little large now that I look at it again, but it's stuck down pretty well, so I don't know if I can get it off. Ah well, I'll just paint it, rust it and tar it a bit.


When I was at the cabin last week, I saw a building that has a steel roof and the flashing was not too far off the dimensions and scale that's on your model. I was going to take a photo, but there's no place to park on the road. Hopefully, next time the Mrs can drive and I'll shoot photo for you.

Weathering will do a lot to tone down the flashing and most older roofs are rusting and have tar repairs.

Here's photos of weathered tin roofs....


Greg

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