Weathering Rolling Stock, a Continous thread

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looking at the scrap loads i had to laugh,some years back i built a layout and bought a few gons then got the bright idea to get some metal shavings to make a load the machine shop i went to gave me all i wanted i went home cleaned the shavings in solvent and loaded a 50ft gon full and glued them in when it was done after several tries i figured out that car had to be within the first 3 cars behind the loco otherwise it would straighten out the train in a curve i now use aluminum pot scrubbers and a false bottom.
 

TLOC

Well-Known Member
looking at the scrap loads i had to laugh,some years back i built a layout and bought a few gons then got the bright idea to get some metal shavings to make a load the machine shop i went to gave me all i wanted i went home cleaned the shavings in solvent and loaded a 50ft gon full and glued them in when it was done after several tries i figured out that car had to be within the first 3 cars behind the loco otherwise it would straighten out the train in a curve i now use aluminum pot scrubbers and a false bottom.
Yep, I have been wondering how this car will track behind trio of locomotives. I is heavy but not as bad as the first ones I built. By using the .250x.250 styrene I get it off the floor of the gondola and a bit less weight.

TomO
 

logandsawman

Well-Known Member
Great thread, I would like some tips on weathering the old wood sided box cars. Most of the photos are b + w and not always the greatest light, however I found this in my Dad's photographs:

Oxen team.png


Many things I like about this shot. First, the town is wrong. I am pretty sure it was taken in Hinckley, MN. I am certain it is not Wyoming as the caption says. I am just about an expert on the Wyoming Deopt.

Ever wonder why they call it the team track? I am certain they pull the team up along the box car and load and unload. by hand. Tough people those Minnesota Swedes and Germans. (I am Swede and wife German)

I would like my old box cars to look like these. Here is one attempt:

NP 90010.jpg


My biggest problem is I always use a differrent technique. I am not totally happy with this one, tried to focus on areas that would collect dirt.

I would appreciate anyone chiming in who has some examples of weathering the wood sided box cars.

Dave LASM
 

TLOC

Well-Known Member
Happy Wednesday! I pulled out a couple more gondolas to work on. I thought I was being extra careful about not duplicating car numbers. These 2 cars started last night are duplicates of the cars I have already finished.

I noticed the numbers only after I pulled the one on the left out of its box. Right now it is drying next to the just finished on the right. The car on the left will get a load of new ties.

A9F362ED-1DAA-436A-80D4-3DDA036B8C68.jpeg
FF7BA571-148B-4F00-8E5D-1B24479AEDEA.jpeg

so much for taking a list with you to a train show
TomO
 

Greg@mnrr

Section Hand
Tom: Just use weathering to "Hide" the last couple of digits of the car's number. Your problem is solved.

Looks great by the way.

Greg

PS: Don't feel bad about buying duplicate car numbers at the train show. I purchased a second Proto C&NW locomotive #1663 at a show and now I have two of the same units!!!
 
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TLOC

Well-Known Member
Hello Crew,

I have been weathering by hand, using Arcylics and Pan Pastels.

Today, I tried using the airbrush on 3 pulp cars. Just a base coat of light rust on the deck and the underside of the cars. Definitely quicker and even but not sure I will do it again. I really like how the decks of my previous pulp cars had worked out. So as a base I am happy but the finish on these cars will be by hand. The 3 pictures
are 3 seperate pulp cars.
93F931E2-A1F4-4981-8C8F-54F34BB622E3.jpeg
75AD1075-5E86-4167-AA12-43F286088F96.jpeg
0C87BDD6-74C4-4A82-ADAF-59C7643AE9BA.jpeg

The wheelset and trucks are by hand
508CA9AD-FC39-4086-A115-96657A94E8ED.jpeg
D499EBCF-4177-4431-9202-8451ABF2498A.jpeg


Constructive criticism is welcome.


TomO
 

Greg@mnrr

Section Hand
Tom: Are you cleaning the wheel faces with alcohol prior to painting? Some of the wheel face didn't take an even coat of paint. I just use a cotton swab dipped in alcohol and give the face(s) a quick wipe. Typically, there's a coating on the wheel surfaces that prevents an even coat of paint.

Greg
 

TLOC

Well-Known Member
I clean with 70% Isopropyl Alcohol. I drop the wheels into jar and after a minute or so I pull a wheel out and clean with a IPA damp paper towel.

That might be the camera angle as I just inspected each of the wheels and the paint is consistently level.

tomO
 

TLOC

Well-Known Member
Here is the wheel and truck process:

WHEELS

1. drop wheels into a jar with Isopropyl Alcohol 70% solution for a minute or 2
2. pick wheels out of the jar and wipe entirely with IPA damp paper towel
3. let air dry
4. apply with a brush Panzer Aces by Vallejo #301 light rust
5. let air dry
6. apply with a brush but with a dabbing motion Panzer Aces by Vallejo #302 dark rust
7. let air dry

TRUCKS

1. ream journal holes with truck turner, mine is from Micro-Mark #82838
2. drop trucks into a jar of 70% IPA for a minute or 2
3. dry with a hair dryer set to the low heat setting
4. apply with a brush Panzer Aces by Vallejo #301 light rust
5. let air dry
6. With a brush apply Pan Pastel # 340.1 permanent Red extra dark
7. with a dry brush blend the Pan Pastel to your liking
8. Optional, since I do not handle my cars too often once on the layout I skip this. Spray Testors DullCote
lightly as too much MAY dissolve the Pan Pastel

Put the wheels into the trucks and the wheelsets are almost complete. But there is almost always paint on the thread, I dip a paper towel with 70% IPA and run the wheels through the wet portion of the towel. Then run the wheels through the dry portion of the paper towel. The wheel should be clean and the process is completed.

TomO
 

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Smudge617

Well-Known Member
Here is the wheel and truck process:

1. drop wheels into a jar with Isopropyl Alcohol 70% solution for a minute or 2
2. pick wheels out of the jar and wipe entirely with IPA damp paper towel
3. let air dry
4. apply with a brush Panzer Aces by Vallejo #301 light rust
5. let air dry
6. apply with a brush but with a dabbing motion Panzer Aces by Vallejo #302 dark rust
7. let air dry

1. ream journal holes with truck turner, mine is from Micro-Mark #82838
2. drop trucks into a jar of 70% IPA for a minute or 2
3. dry with a hair dryer set to the low heat setting
4. apply with a brush Panzer Aces by Vallejo #301 light rust
5. let air dry
6. With a brush apply Pan Pastel # 340.1 permanent Red extra dark
7. with a dry brush blend the Pan Pastel to your liking
8. Optional, since I do not handle my cars too often once on the layout I skip this. Spray Testors DullCote
lightly as too much MAY dissolve the Pan Pastel

Put the wheels into the trucks and the wheelsets are complete

TomO
Never tried that, printing and keeping in my "weathering" box, for when I actually try to do some weathering.
 

Greg@mnrr

Section Hand
Tom: I like the color you selected for the wheel faces. Not overly rusty and not too grimy. Juts right!

I like your use of the egg boxes to hold your models while working on them. Using that method would solve some problems for me since I don't have enough hands when working with models.

Greg
 

TLOC

Well-Known Member
Tom: I like the color you selected for the wheel faces. Not overly rusty and not too grimy. Juts right!

I like your use of the egg boxes to hold your models while working on them. Using that method would solve some problems for me since I don't have enough hands when working with models.

Greg
Thanks Greg. The guy I am weathering these cars for also questioned the wheel faces. He thought they were not heavily rusted enough. Thankfully when I showed him the prototype I was using as an example he was fine. He did send me finally photos for the next 3 cars to do for him. Less rusty!

The egg crates came out of a need years ago. Terry the spousal nit suggested them. I feel the cardboard ones are sturdier then the foam

TomO
 

TLOC

Well-Known Member
Great thread, I would like some tips on weathering the old wood sided box cars. Most of the photos are b + w and not always the greatest light, however I found this in my Dad's photographs:

View attachment 141914

Many things I like about this shot. First, the town is wrong. I am pretty sure it was taken in Hinckley, MN. I am certain it is not Wyoming as the caption says. I am just about an expert on the Wyoming Deopt.

Ever wonder why they call it the team track? I am certain they pull the team up along the box car and load and unload. by hand. Tough people those Minnesota Swedes and Germans. (I am Swede and wife German)

I would like my old box cars to look like these. Here is one attempt:

View attachment 141915

My biggest problem is I always use a differrent technique. I am not totally happy with this one, tried to focus on areas that would collect dirt.

I would appreciate anyone chiming in who has some examples of weathering the wood sided box cars.

Dave LASM
Dave, I have never done a wood sided car. The car looks good overall.

I had seen something about weathering these type of models while researching weathering before I started up. I will see if Incan locate it

TomO
 




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