Weathering Locomotive Grill Work

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CBCNSfan

Registered Member
Staff member
OK! Question, How would you weather the grill works on a GP9, on the long hood, along the side at the top?
I'd like to leave most of screen green but the area of the filters dark gray or black. I was thinking a marker pen, but that may not be the way to go. How would you do it?

Thanks
Willis
 

uspscsx

The Name's Really Matt...
I'd suggest using black chalk/powder and a stiff brush. If not that, use black paint and give it a wash or two. I do suggest masking the areas not desired weathered.
 

uspscsx

The Name's Really Matt...
Or, perhaps, a mixture of washes, then chalk. I guess it comes down to what you can do/have time for.
 

SDP45

I like TYCO!
Chalks are good and inexpensive. Set them with a shot of Dullcote. The Dullcote spray will blow away a little of the chalk, so you may need to add more chalk when done.

Another option would be Rust-All and Blacken-It, if they are still available.

Personally, I'd go with the chalk.
 

CBCNSfan

Registered Member
Staff member
Handy with paint brush = no, Chalk it will be then
guess it comes down to what you can do/have time for.
Hmm time I have, hobby shops I don't have. Other than school chalk and chalk for sidewalk art, that would be all that was available close by. How about some of that war paint powders the ladies use, the clerks may look at me a little strange but I'll tell them it's a gift :D
Willis
 
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dthurman

Guest
Come on guys ;) I just did the fans on my SD40 today with a brush, I used pollyscale Tarnished Black and Grimy Black thinned with some water, then dusted it wth some black chalk. That was N scale :D :eek:
 
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dthurman

Guest
Willis

If you have a steady hand, I would do paint with chalks, here is what I did today. If you can pull off that paint and decal job, I know you can do the rest :)
 

uspscsx

The Name's Really Matt...
David,

Wow, that looks great! How'd you do it.

If you don't mind, post the pictures over in "The Weathering Thread." That would be a great addition to it!
 
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dthurman

Guest
uspscsx said:
David,

Wow, that looks great! How'd you do it.

If you don't mind, post the pictures over in "The Weathering Thread." That would be a great addition to it!
Give me about 20-30 minutes and I will do that :) Got a cut of cars that need o be classified...Still awaiting those interchange agreements :p
 

CBCNSfan

Registered Member
Staff member
That looks real good David. Ok as I read it "you brushed on thinned paint and brushed chalk dust on (before it dried) or (after it dried)"
My hands are pretty steady, eyes are pretty good with glasses.
If you can pull off that paint and decal job,
LOL if you only knew the half of it :D but thanks, I get away with a lot of mistakes. :rolleyes:
I'll put in an order for some paint, theres a MR show Sat. and I can pick it up there. Chalk, well that's another story I'll have to make do with what I can find available. Other than craft supplys at Wall-Mart the cupboard is bare. As they say necessity is the mother of invention.

Willis
 

grande man

Bonafied Grande Nut
After a coat of Dull Cote, I weather grills with chalk. I envision our locos as operating in the dusty environment of coal mining operations, and, since the locos are black, highlight the grills with dust colors. For a green loco, black/dust would look good.

114191761.jpg


114352930.jpg
 

CBCNSfan

Registered Member
Staff member
After a coat of Dull Cote, I weather grills with chalk.
I was kind of thinking the dull coat would be after the chalk. In your method, I'm wondering what seals the chalk to the loco?

Willis
 

uspscsx

The Name's Really Matt...
Another coat of Dullcote. A pre-weathering coat of Dullcote helps the chalk have something to grab onto.
 

grande man

Bonafied Grande Nut
CBCNSfan said:
I was kind of thinking the dull coat would be after the chalk. In your method, I'm wondering what seals the chalk to the loco?

Willis
The Dull Cote holds the chalk pretty well, especially in the grill areas. If you apply DC over the chalk, it fades much of the weathered effect.
 
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dthurman

Guest
I think Willis it depends on how much you think you will be handling your engine(s) as to if you need to seal them, I normally don't on mine, and I handle them a lot for cleaning and rotating. As for the chalk schedule, I painted first, then let dry and then chalked them. I added a small discussion over on the weathering thread.
 

CBCNSfan

Registered Member
Staff member
OK thanks, I don't believe they will be handled all that much, there will be 6 or more road switchers with only 3 in use at a time and the rest in storage off the layout. There are 5 urban areas on the CB&CNS so the RS units get moved around after shop maintenance. The Mainline Loco's remain pretty much the same lashup on a daily basis.
I'll do the " paint/wash , dull coat and chalk " method.
Thanks
Willis
 
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dthurman

Guest
One tip Willis, less is more, always apply less then what you think you need, you can always add more weathering, it's hard to remove if you over do it.
 




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