Using Floquil and the Dio Sol question

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jpolacchi

New Member
So,I'm new here (yes) and I'm sure I am beating a dead horse as this I suspect has been a deeply discussed subject.I have accumulated a fair amount of Floquil paints and as many of you are already aware of,Dio Sol is next to impossible to find unless you stock piled it.The small volumes of it being auctioned off on EBay goes for more than what most of the paint sells for.I know that lacquer thinner has been recommended and used with...I guess "mixed results".I suppose the big difference is the paint dries fast?I've read elsewhere (in here) that some are using the basic components to make their own "thinner" by combining 50/50 ratios of Tolulene (if you can find it) and Xylene.Very toxic,but these are the two main ingredients Dio Sol is comprised of.I'm not sure what else is in it?Being a California resident,I can't find "a good,usable lacquer thinner".EPA rules/laws have made that impossible and I am uncertain if I can find both Xylene and Tolulene to make "home made thinner".I have considered using some hobby line lacquer thinners,but not knowing if those would be recommended or even work with N.O.S Floquil or the Testors "reformulated" brand?I'm just wondering what others are doing and if any of you may be California residents,what are you doing/using to thin out your Floquil paints and if you are still getting good performance from them?
 

jpolacchi

New Member
Hi Alan,many thanks for adding your 2 cents to this thread.I'm not sure if I can buy Xylene or not in CA.?.I actually have not looked(yet). Would you say that buying it from a hardware store would suffice or would you recommend finding the solvent and getting a purer source from a different supplier,or is all this stuff basically the same?Lastly....since I read that someone combines Tolulene with it,that is not a necessary additive?If memory serves,Xylene is sort of "slow drying" and the Tolulene evaporates pretty quickly(like Acetone I guess?).I suspect it isn't since you use the one solvent.
 

Espeefan

Well-Known Member
I buy mine from the hardware store or Wal-Mart. Trade names are Xylene or Xylol. I really think it's all the same, as far as hardware store quality vs "purer" solvents. I've had no issues with drying times. Xylene is less volatile than lacquer thinner or acetone. I also use it to thin Scalecoat 1 and 2. I've been doing this for upwards of 20 years without issues. I do leave several days between coats, especially when changing colors as there is a difference between dry paint and cured paint.
 

jpolacchi

New Member
OK,I was just curious about whether or not is mattered using a product that would be "purer" because I have been told the same about "lacquer thinner" and that using a purer automotive lacquer solvent lacks the impurities in say..."a hardware store brand" thus making it "superior" in some way.As far as "curing" goes,is that where Tolulene comes into play,or no?I'm just curious in knowing the advantages of adding it(or not) to the mix in some way?Lastly,are you thinning your Floquils in the same standard ratio 25% thinner to 75% paint using straight Xylene?Can you thin at a higher ratio or is that ill advised?I've seen some Youtube videos thinning at a 50/50 ratio,but that was also using "Lacquer Thinner" and not Xlyene.
 

Espeefan

Well-Known Member
I thin my Floquils 50-50. Scalecoat I thin 2:1, paint to thinner. I don't see Toluene here much and I find Xylene quite sufficient for my needs. I find the paint flows better with it.
 

Sirfoldalot

Curse You, Red Baron!
Staff member
Xylene and Toluene both are at ACE hardware in California.
I bought a quart of Xylene at HD a couple years back but they don't show it online now; I'm going there tomorrow - I will look,
 

jpolacchi

New Member
Xylene and Toluene both are at ACE hardware in California.
I bought a quart of Xylene at HD a couple years back but they don't show it online now; I'm going there tomorrow - I will look,

Last question I promise unless it sparks further conversation?Is there also any advantage to using the Floquil "Retarder" in any of the paint either while thinning it down for use and/or for storage?Granted,I really don't know how to use the retarder as an additive.I don't believe there are any instructions on the bottle and I went online to Paul Budzik's page and what little literary information I found on Retarder was a tad confusing.There seems to be no real"set" ratio of Retarder to paint or "thinned paint",so is it just "eye-balled" pertaining to volume?I know what it is used for and that's for extending working/drying time and I talked to someone else about using it and he said he would add some in to a bottle to prolong "shelf life".Apparently it improves flow and you are supposed to get "more coverage" out of you paint,so...maybe you use "less" to "get more"?Considering the current value of Floquil paints and the money invested,I would like to give these paints as long a shelf life as possible.I have allot of "standard colors" and some really unique ones.If anyone thinks it would be a good investment and item to have and use,I would appreciate maybe a little more explanation on "how to use it" and if there is more of a standard ratio to paint I can rely on,or if "eye'balling" as as good as anything.
 

Sirfoldalot

Curse You, Red Baron!
Staff member
I have never used the Retarder, so have to let someone more knowledgeable answer that one.
I store all my paints, putty, and anything such as those UPSIDE DOWN. I know that it will keep things from drying out - and you will not get the filming on the top!
I have some 50 YO Floquil that is as good as new!
 




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