TT scale railroad project

ModelRailroadForums.com is a free Model Railroad Discussion Forum and photo gallery. We cover all scales and sizes of model railroads. Whether you're a master model railroader or just getting started, you'll find something of interest here.


Hello everybody!

After seeing and viewing all of the wonderful (And interesting) stuff with pictures regarding Logan valley, I've decided to try starting my own major project. However, I have decided to stick to TT scale almost exclusively as, from what I understand, and correct me if I'm wrong, TT scale is the size and shape commonly used by Power City Trains. Now, before I get into details here, I would like some suggestions as to what kinds of items I might need for adding to this project. I'll supply a list of essentials below...

1: At least one HO scale or TT scale backdrop which features the Appalachian Mountains, whichever works best with Power City Trains.
2: Somebody to test out or send me a backdrop of HO scale and TT scale so they or I can find out which backdrop works best with Power City Trains.

Note: I am looking for either the kind of backdrop which stands up on it's own behind the train set or one which fits over the rails for the trains to go through, sort of like a tunnel.

3: Some way or items which can be used to make trees, grass, gravel, paved roads, and the like.
4: Some kits to construct or make TT scale buildings and possibly figurines as well.

If anybody has any suggestions as to where or how I can obtain the above items, I would greatly appreciate it. In addition to this, if anybody has any good model building skills and they want to share their secrets with me or they'd like to volunteer to help me build some buildings, I would greatly appreciate it.

Below is a list of buildings I am hoping to add to my collection, which have not been made by Power City Trains yet...

1: A farm, preferably one with both crops and livestock or farm animals.
2: A pizzaria and/or bakery.
3: A pet shop.
4: A hobby shop.
5: A bank.
6: Another kind of restaurant.
7: A park or possibly recreation center.
8: A church of some kind.
9: No town is complete without a city hall.
10: Some residential houses, including a gingerbread-style (1800's) house or two and maybe a Tudor-style house.

If anybody has any questions, comments, or suggestions about my project, feel free to post them below...Constructive criticism only please!
Thanks in advance for any and all helpful answers...Cheers!
 

Iron Horseman

Well-Known Member
Wow, I thought TT scale 1/10" = 1 foot had died out in the early 1970s.

Going in reverse. I am afraid the buildings you are looking for are not going to be variable off the shelf here in the USA just because TT has been dead for so many years. Europa will be a better bet. Here is a web site with many references to other TT sites. http://modeltrains.about.com/od/otherscales/tp/TT-Scale--American-Orphan.htm

Item #3 is easy since trees and road material isn't that important on the scale side of things. Any of the Woodland Scenic tree kits would work. For gravel and ballast the N-scale items should work just fine. Likewise the Woodland Scenic grass and dirt of various types will work just fine.

For item #1, backdrops, there should not be much of an issue. Backdrops are just that background, so the only difference would be the "distance" away from the trains they back drop is representing. Try to find one without things in it that have identifiable sizes like an automobile that is close up.
Is Shenendoa close enough or are you talking NE mountains like PA & NY? The one below is from the "Back Drop Warehouse".


Here is another company called Model Railroad Backdrops:
http://railroadbackdrops.com/products-page/backdrop-eastern-mountains-and-valleys/

And then there is "Backdrop Junction".
http://backdropjunction.com/thebackdrops/hillsmountains1.html

Seems just about everyone who owns a large format printer has decided they can sell backdrops.
 
Hi there!

Thanks for your speedy reply. As for the buildings, what is Europa? Do they have a web site I can visit?

I've never heard of Woodland Scenic Kits before. Where/How do I obtain those?

As for the backdrops, I think Shenendoa will do just fine for me. Where/How do I obtain a Shenendoa backdrop?

Again, thanks in advance for your helpful answers, Iron.
 

Cjcrescent

Master Mechanic
Europa=Europe.

As for the others, remember that Google is your friend. Don't be afraid to do some research and reading of any of the several Model Railroading magazines that are out there. Esp. check out the ads. Nowadays there is usually a website in the ad as well.

The basic scenery material is available in just about any LHS, (Local Hobby Shop), plus any of those listed in the this topic.

http://www.modelrailroadforums.com/forum/showthread.php?14459-Best-Hobby-Shops-on-the-Web
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Jim 68cuda

Active Member
I will be interesting to watch your progress. I don't think I've ever actually seen a TT scale layout (1:120 scale). I had it confused with OO scale (1:76 scale) which is slightly larger than HO scale (1:87 scale). I have never seen an OO scale layout either, but I knew it was slightly larger than HO. I guess like OO, TT must be a more popular scale in Europe than it is in the U.S. I will guess you will need to scratch build most of your structures, and if you are modeling an American location, you will likely end up having an almost impossible task of finding TT scale American vehicles.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Hobby lobby selld some woodland scenic products you can also can go to woodland scenic.com
I checked out the Woodland Scenic web site and indeed, they have some interesting little kits, but my next question is this... HO scale or N scale? Which is better? N scale is 1:160 and HO scale is 1:87. TT scale is 1:120, which is just a little closer to HO scale than to N scale-Correct me if I'm wrong, but I'd rather have my layout a little big instead of a little small.

Have you considered a 3D printed town? At 1:450 stuff is tiny and does not eat up a ton of material which is how 3D printing is charged.
I have never heard of a 3D printed town. And since I don't currently have a working printer, I am not sure how to make/obtain one...Hints please!
 

Jim 68cuda

Active Member
As for 1:120 American vehicles, there is Howard Models, an architectural model building supplier than makes vehicles for various scales. They list 1:120 scale and the vehicles shown on their website appear to be late 1990's Dodge passenger cars, SUVs, minivans and pickups. It would be a start anyway. It looks like they have a minimum order size, so you might need to order the assorted set plus a few extra vehicles (or some of their figures to populate your town).
http://www.howardmodels.com/supplies/onlineorderform.htm

Here's a vendor with a few earlier American vehicles (40's & 50's) in TT scale.
http://www.mini-things.com/resin.html#resintt


3D printed buildings would not be made using a standard printer. That would require a 3D printer which usually creates a 3D object by "printing" layer upon layer of a material other than ink (usually a resin) to build up a 3 dimensional object from the ground up. Since few people have their own 3D printer, there are companies who will "print" 3D objects from your CAD design and who can also sell the printed objects to others if desired. You may find some TT scale buildings or details through Shapeways, which is one such company that specializes in 3D printing.
http://www.shapeways.com/
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Jim 68cuda

Active Member
Another option for structures would be to print paper structures and assemble them. Of course, you'll need to get your printer working first.
There are threads here that list some different websites where you can find such structures, though they may not always be in your scale of choice. There is also software available that will allow you to design and print your own structures in the scale of your choice. Of course, they will print on paper. You will need to cut the walls out or the paper and attach them to a more sturdy backing before assembly. Here's one option (their free trial structure is not available in TT, scale but the available software does include 1:120 scale).

http://www.modeltrainsoftware.com/model-builder.html

You'll find threads on this forum, with a little searching, that will link to other sites that might be helpful if you decide to print structures on your printer.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Jim 68cuda

Active Member
As for choosing N scale or HO scale structures or details, neither scale would be a good choice with TT scale. TT scale appears to be halfway between HO and N. The best you could do with N scale is to use N scale near the backdrop (Near no TT scale features including the train) so that it appears they are farther away in the distance (forced perspective).
http://www.dfwtrainshows.com/files/scales.jpg
http://www.mini-things.com/ttcomp1.JPG

Walthers does have a small selection of TT scale items (European vehicles, figures, European structures, etc) I suggest you look closely at their offerings to see what you might be able to use. Maybe you can modify some of the structures to look more American. It looks like most TT products on their website are either not in stock or are special order items. You may want to call them before ordering to get an idea of how long it would take to receive a special order.

https://www.walthers.com/exec/searc...rds=restrict&instock=Q&split=30&Submit=Search

https://www.walthers.com/exec/page/search
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Iron Horseman

Well-Known Member
As for the buildings, what is Europa?
Sorry for the slang, I mean all the countries of the European and Western Asian continents.

I've never heard of Woodland Scenic Kits before. Where/How do I obtain those?
Hobby Lobby carries their products, and I would think most other hobby stores too, Like HobbyTown USA.

As for the backdrops, I think Shenendoa will do just fine for me. Where/How do I obtain a Shenendoa backdrop?
Here is the URL for their main page http://www.backdropwarehouse.com/indexbdwh.htm
 
Oh Oh Oh My mistake I thought we were talking about 1:450 T gauge not 1:120 TT scale...

I knew a British TT modeler who said that the advantage was the presence of HO scale in the compactness of N.
 

tootnkumin

Well-Known Member
Staff member
I just googled Power City Trains (formerly just Power Trains) and was surprised to find quite a few youtube videos about them, could be another avenue for ideas. Does Kalmbach ( Model Trains Magazine) still do their 'Toy Trains' magazine? could be a source of info too.
 
As for choosing N scale or HO scale structures or details, neither scale would be a good choice with TT scale. TT scale appears to be halfway between HO and N. The best you could do with N scale is to use N scale near the backdrop (Near no TT scale features including the train) so that it appears they are farther away in the distance (forced perspective).
http://www.dfwtrainshows.com/files/scales.jpg
http://www.mini-things.com/ttcomp1.JPG

Walthers does have a small selection of TT scale items (European vehicles, figures, European structures, etc) I suggest you look closely at their offerings to see what you might be able to use. Maybe you can modify some of the structures to look more American. It looks like most TT products on their website are either not in stock or are special order items. You may want to call them before ordering to get an idea of how long it would take to receive a special order.

https://www.walthers.com/exec/searc...rds=restrict&instock=Q&split=30&Submit=Search

https://www.walthers.com/exec/page/search
Hi again, fellow railroaders!

Yesterday was quite busy for me, so I did not have a lot of time to browse this forum. But when I saw all the replies here, I was very impressed. Jim, the reply which you made, which I highlighted above, seems to instill the most confidence in me. While it's not good news neither HO scale or N scale work well with TT scale trains, I feel as though I can probably afford to try both N scale and HO scale and see which of those looks best with my train set. As for the replies you made earlier, I feel it is best for me to simply buy some kits from Woodland Scenics and/or Scene-A-Rama. I know they both have a wide variety of products and possibly a way to get in touch with them. I'll be sure to make a note of my progress as I go along...Wish me luck!
 

Jim 68cuda

Active Member
If you choose to use HO scale structures, I suggest you look on e-bay for some very old Faller kits, and some very old HO scale Plasticville kits. Quite often (but not with any consistency) these older structures from the 50's and 60's were slightly under scale for HO. For example, I have an old Faller Shell gas station (it was also sold under the Atlas name). The structures doors are sufficiently small enough to prevent an HO scale figure from passing through. Likewise, some of the really old HO scale Plasticville structures (post office, supermarket, ranch house, corner theatre, colonial house) were such small structures that you can't possibly imagine an HO scale interior in them. Another possibility to search for on E-bay for slightly under scale HO structures is an old Hallmark series of plastic Christmas Village buildings from the "Sarah Plain and Tall" There were two different houses, a church, a General Store and a train station. They appear to be close to HO scale, but the doors are definitely too small for an HO figure. The Hallmark structures are actually quite nice and one of the houses would likely be a good start to the farm on your layout (if its not too big). For the small but unusual TT scale size, you might also visit a Hallmark card store and look at their annual collection of Christmas Tree ornaments (I think the ornaments usually come out in July or August for the following Christmas. They frequently have one or two structures that are meant to hang on a tree and are somewhere between HO scale and N scale.
Of course the problem will be trying to determine if an HO scale structure is small enough in size and height, to pass for TT. You will have a difficult time figuring that out unless you can look at the built structures in person. Might be best to attend a large model train show in your area and look for used structures.
Not sayin that using HO structures with TT scale is a good mix, but if you're going to do it, look for HO structures that are technically too small for HO.


http://www.ebay.com/itm/PLASTICVILL...412307?pt=Model_RR_Trains&hash=item5661590893

http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Sealed-...372053?pt=Model_RR_Trains&hash=item3a9276f295

http://www.ebay.com/itm/HALLMARK-SA...856075?pt=Model_RR_Trains&hash=item53f5c8b14b

http://www.ebay.com/itm/42-LOT-OF-B...421803?pt=Model_RR_Trains&hash=item51be8f6deb

http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/faller-217-shell-gas-station-box-ho-20516627
 
Last edited by a moderator:
If you choose to use HO scale structures, I suggest you look on e-bay for some very old Faller kits, and some very old HO scale Plasticville kits. Quite often (but not with any consistency) these older structures from the 50's and 60's were slightly under scale for HO. For example, I have an old Faller Shell gas station (it was also sold under the Atlas name). The structures doors are sufficiently small enough to prevent an HO scale figure from passing through. Likewise, some of the really old HO scale Plasticville structures (post office, supermarket, ranch house, corner theatre, colonial house) were such small structures that you can't possibly imagine an HO scale interior in them. Another possibility to search for on E-bay for slightly under scale HO structures is an old Hallmark series of plastic Christmas Village buildings from the "Sarah Plain and Tall" There were two different houses, a church, a General Store and a train station. They appear to be close to HO scale, but the doors are definitely too small for an HO figure. The Hallmark structures are actually quite nice and one of the houses would likely be a good start to the farm on your layout (if its not too big). For the small but unusual TT scale size, you might also visit a Hallmark card store and look at their annual collection of Christmas Tree ornaments (I think the ornaments usually come out in July or August for the following Christmas. They frequently have one or two structures that are meant to hang on a tree and are somewhere between HO scale and N scale.
Of course the problem will be trying to determine if an HO scale structure is small enough in size and height, to pass for TT. You will have a difficult time figuring that out unless you can look at the built structures in person. Might be best to attend a large model train show in your area and look for used structures.
Not sayin that using HO structures with TT scale is a good mix, but if you're going to do it, look for HO structures that are technically too small for HO.


http://www.ebay.com/itm/PLASTICVILL...412307?pt=Model_RR_Trains&hash=item5661590893

http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Sealed-...372053?pt=Model_RR_Trains&hash=item3a9276f295

http://www.ebay.com/itm/HALLMARK-SA...856075?pt=Model_RR_Trains&hash=item53f5c8b14b

http://www.ebay.com/itm/42-LOT-OF-B...421803?pt=Model_RR_Trains&hash=item51be8f6deb

http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/faller-217-shell-gas-station-box-ho-20516627
Hello again! Thanks for all these helpful and awesome e-bay links. As I read your post, I started to think perhaps it would be nice for me to include some vintage 50's to 60's buildings in my layout as I am considering having a rich history for the town I plan to build up. What I can do is bring one of my train sets or at least the engine to a train show or convention as you mentioned. Once there, I might be able to do a size comparison so I can see how big or small my train looks compared to an HO scale sized engine or building...Cheers! And by the way, I really like the movie Sarah, Plain and Tall. I have it and the sequel (Skylark) on VHS, but would love to have the entire trilogy on DVD. If I can find those, it'll be awesome.
 
Hello again!

It has been a while since I posted anything in my thread here-Things have been busy for me. But I have decided to use HO-scale buildings, figures, and scenery for my layout as I found my Power Trains are just a little closer to HO-scale than they are to N-scale. Now, I know some of you may be wondering why I'm simply using regular HO-scale buildings and the like, but my reason for this is because I feel my trains (Though on the small size) are big enough to be used with regular HO-scale buildings and figures. As one person pointed out, my trains appear to have a 1:117 scale ratio. Yes, I realize this is VERY close to TT scale, however, it is also a little closer to HO scale than N scale as mentioned above. So based on this, my instinct is telling me to stick with regular HO scale items and scenery.

What I need next is an idea of how to place roads (For cars) next to and across my railroad tracks in a way which won't look sloppy. Any layout ideas are most welcome...Cheers!
 

jdetray

Well-Known Member
As I pointed out in another discussion forum, Power Trains are not TT-scale or any other generally recognized scale. They run on plastic track and are controlled using buttons on the locos. Based on the length of the locos and freight cars, it seems they are closer to TT than to any other established scale, which is why I suggested that TT-scale structures might be appropriate. The 1:117 scale factor mentioned by the original poster is based on his measurement of the distance between the rails of the Power Trains track, which he says is exactly 1/2-inch.

I think the suggestion of cardstock and paper buildings is an excellent one! There are hundreds of free cardstock and paper structures available for downloading. Diligent searching with Google will lead you to them. With an image editing program, you can print cardstock structures at any scale you wish. You could have a lot of buildings at very low cost with this approach.

If you are willing to spend a few dollars, there is software available for making cardstock building printouts. See:
http://www.modeltrainsoftware.com/

Clever Models does not offer anything in TT-scale, but they sell computer files for printing cardstock buildings in other scales. It's worth a look if only to see how nice a cardstock building can appear. Who knows, they might be scalable:
http://www.clevermodels.net/

And check the following link for how a fellow forum member has made some great looking buildings from cardboard cereal boxes. They look great, and the technique will work in any scale, of course!
http://www.modelrailroadforums.com/...-beginner-HO-layout-4-x-6-in-my-garage/page16

- Jeff
 




Affiliate Disclosure: We may receive a commision from some of the links and ads shown on this website (Learn More Here)


ModelRailroadForums.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com

RailroadBookstore.com - An online railroad bookstore featuring a curated selection of new and used railroad books. Railroad pictorials, railroad history, steam locomotives, passenger trains, modern railroading. Hundreds of titles available, most at discount prices! We also have a video and children's book section.

ModelRailroadBookstore.com - An online model railroad bookstore featuring a curated selection of new and used books. Layout design, track plans, scenery and structure building, wiring, DCC, Tinplate, Toy Trains, Price Guides and more.

Top