No-ox question

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I've applied no-ox-id to all the rails on my layout, (all 200' of them) after vacuuming them, cleaning them with a track eraser, and using straight metal polish thoroughly cleaned off with rubbing alcohol. I also made sure all locos got a run over a section covered with no-ox-id, but then I got bored and left it overnight. Now, in the morning I cleaned it off by wiping 2/3 times until there was only a faint trace of black left on the paper towel. Fast forward a couple days and things aren't running as smoothly as I'd hoped, and if I run a paper towel over sections that have been run on, I get a lot of black stuff off. Is this due to improper cleaning? Perhaps not getting the metal polish off thoroughly? Or is it due to the locomotives having dirty wheels? Should I no-ox up my test track and give my locos a good run on it, since I don't have continuous running on my layout?
 

Iron Horseman

Well-Known Member
I've applied no-ox-id to all the rails on my layout, (all 200' of them) after vacuuming them, cleaning them with a track eraser, and using straight metal polish thoroughly cleaned off with rubbing alcohol. I also made sure all locos got a run over a section covered with no-ox-id, but then I got bored and left it overnight. Now, in the morning I cleaned it off by wiping 2/3 times until there was only a faint trace of black left on the paper towel. Fast forward a couple days and things aren't running as smoothly as I'd hoped, and if I run a paper towel over sections that have been run on, I get a lot of black stuff off. Is this due to improper cleaning? Perhaps not getting the metal polish off thoroughly? Or is it due to the locomotives having dirty wheels? Should I no-ox up my test track and give my locos a good run on it, since I don't have continuous running on my layout?
Unless you live a an environment where you are having oxidation problems I would avoid putting anything on the rails that might interfere with electrical conductivity. There are many variations of the no-ox products and many are like wax. Only the one called something like "NO-OX-ID A-Special" is advertised to conduct electricity. Are you certain the black stuff isn't a side product of the NO-OX.

Are the locomotives performing poorly or are you just seeing black stuff? I am not convinced that the black stuff off of the rails is bad. I mean is your mind inventing a problem that doesn't really exist.
 

santafewillie

Well-Known Member
Are you running freight cars with dirty wheels? Especially if they are plastic. Also just running the engines over a section with NO-OX doesn't necessarily clean their wheels. I don't use NO-OX but I wasn't aware of the information that Iron Horseman wrote...interesting. I use alcohol to clean engine wheels. Just soak a folded paper towel with it and lay it on a powered section of track. Take your engine and set one truck on the paper towel and the other on the track and let the wheels spin. Hold on to the towel and engine of course. Shift the towel slightly and turn the engine around and do the other truck the same way. I only have diesels so I don't know how this might work with steamers.
Willie
 




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