Mating rail to trestle deck

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DakotaLove39

Always Improvising
Hey guys. I've hit a snag on my module.

I am currently at this point. I have my Code 83 flex-track cut to about 2', and I have removed a big chunk of the ties to accomodate this bridge deck. I'm using the Walther's wooden trestle plastic kit.

IMG_20210328_185146159.jpg

I have absolutely no idea what glue I should use to stick my track to this bridge. I have been advised to use a product called Pliobond glue, but no one in my area has it. I have checked hardware stores big and small, hobby stores, and online. Can't seem to get it. So what's another one that will work? I have E-6000 on hand but I'm not sure that will work for this as it sets up very quickly.

IMG_20210328_185124815.jpg

Also on my dry test-fits, this bridge seems to hold gauge very well by default. I had a loco holding the rail down on the molded tie-plates, and my NMRA gauge confirmed everything was good this way. Do I need fancy track gauge tools when I finally get this deck secured? This is my first time doing layout work of any kind on my own.
 

Selector

Well-Known Member
You can use any of the following:

a. Gel cyanoacrylate (superglue);
b. Yellow glue;
c. White glue;
d. Aleene's Tacky Glue;
e. acrylic latex caulk;
f. adhesive caulk;
g; contact cement;
h. Parr bond; or
j. epoxy

The liquid glues I mentioned will work, but you'll have to clamp the rails in place somehow, ensuring they stay in gauge while the liquid glue dries. Then, avoid getting the glue wet again.

Epoxy is hard, durable, and very positive. More finnicky because you have to mix it accurately measured in two parts, and then mixed very thoroughly. It will take about 10 hours to harden, unless you use the 'five minute' kind in the double-plunger applicator found at all hardware stores. Even then, it isn't really five minute epoxy. Closer to 35 minute epoxy.

The caulks and Parr Bond work well, but again, double check for gauge, and do let them cure for several hours.

Gel CA is really easy to work with, and it stays put, and it gives you time to adjust. I think you can get retarders, but I'm not sure.

Whatever you end up trying, go light. You don't want gobs welling up around the base of the rails and spilling over tie and spikehead details. Might be wise to practice with some disposable rail and some ties or something to see how you're going to lay the bead of adhesive.
 

GeeTee

Well-Known Member
I ve never had much luck with glues on metal , its just to smooth to get a good bond , If it were me , I would get out the pin vise pre drill some holes and spike it down . Either dipping the spikes in water first, or wiping the whole thing with water afterwards . You may have to brush the spikes on the bottom first.

Most glues will seperate from the rail due to thermal cycling /expansion , it just takes a little time for it happen. Spiking avoids that it allows the rail to move back and forth.
 

rgeiter

Conrail
I ve never had much luck with glues on metal , its just to smooth to get a good bond , If it were me , I would get out the pin vise pre drill some holes and spike it down . Either dipping the spikes in water first, or wiping the whole thing with water afterwards . You may have to brush the spikes on the bottom first.

Most glues will seperate from the rail due to thermal cycling /expansion , it just takes a little time for it happen. Spiking avoids that it allows the rail to move back and forth.
That’s what I would do too. Additionally, I would dip the spike in some glue (Goo) and then insert it in the pre-drilled hole. The goo will keep the spike secure.
 

TLOC

Well-Known Member
I used ME code 70 rail to Central Valley tie strips.

I used a mix of MEK and Barge cement. Applied to the bottom of the rail and then applied as drops from a syringe to each tie. Press fit together. Now when I get the occasional loose rail since installation in 2015 I use super glue from the Dollar Store.

TomO
 

DakotaLove39

Always Improvising
I ve never had much luck with glues on metal , its just to smooth to get a good bond , If it were me , I would get out the pin vise pre drill some holes and spike it down . Either dipping the spikes in water first, or wiping the whole thing with water afterwards . You may have to brush the spikes on the bottom first.

Most glues will seperate from the rail due to thermal cycling /expansion , it just takes a little time for it happen. Spiking avoids that it allows the rail to move back and forth.
Yeah but spiking rail to a plastic bridge? Never heard of that ever before.
 

Ash Pit

Well-Known Member
I have always built the trestle's deck right on the bench. After the deck with the track and rails are secured to the deck in what ever way is needed, glued; or, spiked to the deck, I attach the Bents to the underside. I have built trestles using both ways and have had it work out well.
 

Rico

BN Modeller
I’ve used CA for this but “roughed up“ the rail with a file to get a better bond.
So far so good, it’s held for ten years.
 

rgeiter

Conrail
The warren truss bridge I built, I used Shinohara bridge track and CA’ed it to the bridge beams. Saves a lot of hassle.

Shinohara? Are they even around anymore? Did Walthers buy their track making stuff?
 

Iron Horseman

Well-Known Member
I used fast drying epoxy. Spread it on the bottom side of the rail. Was expecting the project to be a nightmare, but it went very smoothly. Runs great.
 




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