It's slowly getting there

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PrairieKnight

Active Member
I had the same question as Greg...HO or N scale. I am guessing it is N scale because of where in the forum op posted originally. Another question I have is how are the legs working for the layout. I have HO and I tried using the saw horses like you have in your first photos on my 4' X 8'. The saw horses did not work well for me. I think you did a first rate job on how you braced things in. But I am wondering if the legs on the sawhorses might prove to be to close together... what I mean is..... should each of the eight legs be spread out closer to the outer edge of the cross pieces. I am thinking this might give you a little more stability as you work on track and scenery in the middle of the layout.

I like your layout with the spur coming off to the right and around towards the bottom of the layout. This could lead to an extension with a nice yard area. This would make an L shaped layout. I based my HO layout on the MR Virginian layout from a few years ago. I modified it a bit and have a spur coming off of the outer oval on the right side towards the bottom that will eventually lead into a yard and an L shaped layout.

I am looking forward to following your progress.
 

oplholik

Member
The legs are working out fine, nice and solid. This is an N scale layout.
Currently trying to work this out. Only two switches, I like that.
Windy layout.jpg
 

wombat457

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Nice straight forward design that offers some interaction.

My initial concern is the amount of room you have to obtain the grade needed for you cross over. "General rule of thumb" is you need 100" of horizontal track to attain an X percent grade. In other words, for N Scale, to achieve a 1.75" clearance at the cross over (or just prior to it) you will need 100" of horizontal track with a vertical height (at the cross over) of 1.75" as well as a little more horizontal track to accommodate the transition for the grades up and down.

The "good news though" is this - A lot of people say that N Scale trains can negotiate up to a 4% grade. IF that is true, taking into account the engine type and number of rolling stock being pulled, you could achieve a 2% (1.75%) grade over only 50" (4') of horizontal track.

I think I'd move my turnouts back a little from the start of your curve, top and bottom. Most N Scale modern engines are around 5" - 5.5" in length so if you were to move the turnouts back into the straights about 6" from the start of the curve, I think you'd be better of and reduce the possibility of any potential problems.

Sorry to be a little bit picky, but better to have "possible issues" pointed out before things get started.
 

wombat457

Well-Known Member
Staff member
oplholik,

Did your plan in SCARM and you have plenty of room for the cross overs :) Took the liberty of modifying yours a "little" just for interests sake.

Here is your plan in 3D:



Oops, got it back the front. The left side in the shot is really the right side and visa versa :rolleyes:

Modified:

 

wombat457

Well-Known Member
Staff member
No problem, just thought you'd like to see how it would look in 3D. Feel free to tell me to butt out if you think I am interfering though.
 

Iron Horseman

Well-Known Member
Did your plan in SCARM and you have plenty of room for the cross overs :) Took the liberty of modifying yours a "little" just for interests sake.
I would "reverse" the grades. That is make the underpasses bridges, and the bridges the underpasses. That would reduce the steepest grade, and reduce the over all gradient of the entire plan. But that would also cause a totally different scenic effect.
 

wombat457

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Good point horseman, although the steepest grade was a little less than 2% from memory. I didn't save it either so I can't switch things around for comparison.
 

oplholik

Member
An update, I'm getting ready to order my track for the layout below, but before I do, I wanted to put this out there. This ended up with more switches than I wanted to deal with, but it's what is needed to get what I wanted in the layout. As you can see, there are three spots the track doesn't come together, but I think that when I actually lay the track down, it can be tweaked, and coaxed into position.

Oval with turnouts.jpg
 

wombat457

Well-Known Member
Staff member
If you use flex track there wont be an issue with the track joining together properly. From how it looks, it just seems as though the drawing of the track is a little out of alignment at the bottom so nothing to worry about :)
 

oplholik

Member
Yeah, I can see a couple places using flex will help.
I'm just going to do the outer track for now with three switches to access the inside track, which I can add later.
 

wombat457

Well-Known Member
Staff member
That'll work and wont tie you into anything. Who knows, you may want to add track to your sidings.
 

oplholik

Member
Well, it's been awhile. Slowly, very slowly, I have been changing things around trying to get something I really like on my small layout. Hopefully, before too long I'll get a photo up on what I settle on. Recently ripped up some track, added a slight incline on one end of the main oval. Now I'm working out what I want in the center. Fun, fun. :)
 




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