How to recreate this...

ModelRailroadForums.com is a free Model Railroad Discussion Forum and photo gallery. We cover all scales and sizes of model railroads. Whether you're a master model railroader or just getting started, you'll find something of interest here.


wombat457

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Hi Guy's,

The following pictures were taken within a 10 minute drive of my home and what I would like to replicate for my G Gauge layout. On the face of it, it should be pretty easy; however, everything I have tried has failed miserably. As such, I am hoping that some of our Scenery Guru's can give me some ideas of the best way to make these rock faces.

Img_0013_zpswj4jd3um.jpg


Img_0019_zpsdhfxxmyt.jpg


Img_0014_zpsjyavqft8.jpg


Img_0012_zpsqc5vpa6a.jpg


Img_0017_zpswgsrx8ql.jpg


Img_0018_zpsysfqvqzh.jpg


The last picture above is how I would like the end result to be but am more interested in how to create the "rock face" for the vegetation to sit on and in.

Thanks and looking forward to the advice and suggestions.
 

unkaboose

Member
im thinking build it useing layers of constuction foam and then use a drimel tool with a wire brush on it and grind the face of it in straight lines useing different pressure on it as you go to get the irregularitys of depth
 

wombat457

Well-Known Member
Staff member
unkaboose,

That's an idea, thanks. Construction foam should hold up to the weather as well, once it was sealed with something.
 

CBCNSfan

Registered Member
Staff member
Don't know if you can find them now, but I saw similar formations modeled wit pieces of broken ceiling tiles stacked glued together then the exposed edges brushed with a wire brush latex paint did the rest
Cheers
Willis
 

wombat457

Well-Known Member
Staff member
That might not be a bad way to go either. Might be time to pay a visit to the local Lowes and see what they have. Cheers.
 

dave1905

Active Member
Break off pieces if ceiling tile and stack them.

Or find a deposit of shale and make rubber molds of the shale.
 

wombat457

Well-Known Member
Staff member
There is a heap of shale at the foot of the faces that I photographed. Most of them are a little too thick for the scale though, without sorting through them all, and trust me, where these faces are - I really don't want my butt hanging out over the road :)
 

Cjcrescent

Master Mechanic
You can always make molds from big pieces of coal. I have a piece in my yard that is about 2.5'x1'x3'. I think that I can get about 100 molds off of it, before I need to break it apart for more surfaces that are different.

Course, I'll never need that many molds. I'm actually just gonna get 5-8 off of it.
 

wombat457

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Never thought of using coal - that would save time and make it easier. As the weather was lousy here, I tried a couple of things myself. One thing I did try was using Dental Stone with a little concrete coloring in it then (as was suggested earlier) used the dremel to cut the lines etc. Once it had dried I broke t up with a hammer then laid the broken piece (like a jig saw) back on layer of plaster.

It didn't come out too bad (I'll post some picks for comments) BUT takes for ever to do, so I think Carey's mold idea is the way to go.
 

wombat457

Well-Known Member
Staff member
This what I ended up with using Dental Stone:

Img_0021_zpsscgj8btl.jpg


Img_0025_zpsqg5ttiux.jpg


It's a bit "rough" but I think it looks like rock, more or less. If this does work, in that the Dental Stone (once treated/sealed) will stand up to being outside as it is (apparently) supposed to, then I will make molds 1/8" (3 1/2"), 1/4" (7") and 1/2" (14") thick by 2". That will give me the ability to make "plates" that I can then layer to get (hopefully) a truer representation of the actual rock faces around here.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Iron Horseman

Well-Known Member
Don't know if you can find them now, but I saw similar formations modeled wit pieces of broken ceiling tiles stacked glued together then the exposed edges brushed with a wire brush latex paint did the rest
Yup, that is what I was going to suggest. The problem with ceiling tiles is the "rows of rock" end up being too straight and too even. At the club we got some wet and split other horizontally which broke up the straightness a bit more.
 

wombat457

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Well, it was a good thought none the less Horseman. Despite what I have done, I am still looking and working on getting that stratification.
 

OldGuyHO

Member
I found a "formation" of mud dried into stratified layers along a creek. It was perfect for HO, might work for larger scales. Except that it was in a wildlife park and getting permission to cast it would have been difficult.
 

wombat457

Well-Known Member
Staff member
OldGuy,

That figures, all the good stuff is in a place that is protected or too darn hard to get access to :(
 

unkaboose

Member
the only other thing i thought of was the broken edges of slate, would be the proper color and it has a tendency to have stratified edges when broken. the only concern would be weight
 

wombat457

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Tree bark.

I've seen a few articles where tree bark is used to make very convincing stratified rock faces.

Here is one of them. Click on his photos to see larger versions.

http://cprailmmsub.blogspot.com/2014/07/more-tree-bark-for-rocks.html

- Jeff
Jeff,

Darn, that does look good and I have 1000's of acres of trees for bark all around me :)

the only other thing i thought of was the broken edges of slate, would be the proper color and it has a tendency to have stratified edges when broken. the only concern would be weight
I was begining to think that I was going to have to start trolling the road sides for shale to use, which is what I think you might be referring to. Weight wont be an issue though - whatever I use will be sitting on the ground, the real ground. :)
 

OldGuyHO

Member
I was thinking about this. Because of fractalization, and the fact that it's outdoors, why not use real rock with a similar texture. Because of the "sea shore" effect, the smaller features of the rock will substitute for the larger features.
 

wombat457

Well-Known Member
Staff member
OldGuy,

Your absolutely right about using real rocks, and in my own defense, I will be using real rock throughout the layout for the most part and for all rocks that do not replicate slate faces. For the most part, the striations in real life vary from about 3" up to about 15" on ave, so that would leave a scaled version ranging from around 0.1" to 0.5", 1:29 scale. The 1/2" (0.5) is easily doable. The 0.1" not so much.
 




Affiliate Disclosure: We may receive a commision from some of the links and ads shown on this website (Learn More Here)


ModelRailroadForums.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com

RailroadBookstore.com - An online railroad bookstore featuring a curated selection of new and used railroad books. Railroad pictorials, railroad history, steam locomotives, passenger trains, modern railroading. Hundreds of titles available, most at discount prices! We also have a video and children's book section.

ModelRailroadBookstore.com - An online model railroad bookstore featuring a curated selection of new and used books. Layout design, track plans, scenery and structure building, wiring, DCC, Tinplate, Toy Trains, Price Guides and more.

Top