Generic Weathering

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MLW

Active Member
Weather Attempt 3

The weathering is too heavy. Again!:(

But I did not break any fine details on this one. Not much in fine details anyways!!:p
I took the pictures in a hurry today so it’s blurry and shadowy:mad: .
I’ll take better pics on my days off.

Your feedback/comments welcome

Thx


.
 

enjineerbill

Avid People Watcher
I happen to be on the 'other' side

MLW, Sorry but I think the car looks great. While it may seem heavy to you, I have seen many in this shape especially on short lines. I too, have been to 'Showcase' sights and I know what the powers that be would say, however for the likes of me and most peers here, It looks GREAT!!!

I am not trying to speak for anyone else on this forum. This is my opinion of your post.:eek:

Johnny

keep up the great work!!:D
 

MLW

Active Member
Hey thanks!!

I find that I get carried away and “keep on going” when I should stop.:mad:
I also find the learning curve pretty steep. :eek: Eventually it should be pretty decent. I hope!

There’s a prototype for everything I suppose

Thx for the comments
 
I think the hopper looks great. Although I haven't tried to weather any rolling stock myself, the one thing I have noticed on various forums is too much consistancy. Any railroad more than likely has everything from a brand new car to real rust buckets. So I like to see everything from heavy to very light in a single consist.
Tom
 

NYW&B

Member
Conductor - If modeling a derelict car on an abandonned siding, the model shown at the head of this thread would be believable. However, in the case of an in-service piece of rolling stock, it just won't cut it. For one thing, the reporting marks and other important data are no longer clearly visible. Likewise, I would doubt any reputable company would allow their product to be shipped in a car in this condition.

NYW&B
 
Last edited by a moderator:

uspscsx

The Name's Really Matt...
NYW&B said:
Conductor - If modeling a derelict car on an abandonned siding, the model shown at the head of this thread would be believable. However, in the case of an in-service piece of rolling stock, it just won't cut it. For one thing, the reporting marks and other important data are no longer clearly visible. Likewise, I would doubt any reputable company would allow their product to be shipped in a car in this condition.

NYW&B
http://rr-fallenflags.org/sout/sou91779asb.jpg
 

MLW

Active Member
NYW&B thanks for your feedback.

Has you may know I am new at this and trying to do my best. Maybe you have some skills and know-how that I could use.
I am always open to new method, especially if it helps to improve my skills. Please feel free to post a “how-to”.

Around here we have 2 major yards served by two Class 1. I have observed in my recent railfanning trip that cars (and I mean boxcar, hoppers, cover hoppers, gondolas etc..) comes in many shade of dust, rust, sooth, dirt, grime, exhaust stain, oil, grease, paint, scratches, dents, repairs etc.. etc..

I have also noticed that some cars are really beat up: paint is flaking, the data is no longer readable and the reporting mark are fainted and very hard to make up. These cars are not limited to this country class1 but come from the USA and Mexico too.

I think there is a truism here when modelers say “there’s a prototype for everything”. I haven’t seen one that look as bad as my model, but I’m sure if I look hard enough on my next trip I will find a few.

Overall I am not too worried about my model not looking like exact replica of the real thing. It’s all in good fun and I try not to take myself too seriously

Cheers

MLW
 
Last edited by a moderator:

NYW&B

Member
MLW said:
NYW&B thanks for your feedback.

Has you may know I am new at this and trying to do my best. Maybe you have some skills and know-how that I could use.
I am always open to new method, especially if it helps to improve my skills. Please feel free to post a “how-to”.

Around here we have 2 major yards served by two Class 1. I have observed in my recent railfanning trip that cars (and I mean boxcar, hoppers, cover hoppers, gondolas etc..) comes in many shade of dust, rust, sooth, dirt, grime, exhaust stain, oil, grease, paint, scratches, dents, repairs etc.. etc..

I have also noticed that some cars are really beat up: paint is flaking, the data is no longer readable and the reporting mark are fainted and very hard to make up. These cars are not limited to this country class1 but come from the USA and Mexico too.

I think there is a truism here when modelers say “there’s a prototype for everything”. I haven’t seen one that look as bad as my model, but I’m sure if I look hard enough on my next trip I will find a few.

Overall I am not too worried about my model not looking like exact replica of the real thing. It’s all in good fun and I try not to take myself too seriously

Cheers

MLW
MLW - I appreciate your being a newbie and was not being harsh but simply pointing out what would usually be encountered or acceptible practice in the real world.

A car without visible/ledgible reporting marks can not generally be forwarded or used in interchange service. At worst, a really bad car will at least have had its most important data re-stenciled for ID and safety purposes. Likewise, many shippers wouldn't accept having their product transported in a potentially unsafe/physically marginal car. I'll grant that some of the worst rolling wrecks even to see the rails are in service today (it definitely wasn't so in the past, especially during the steam era - save perhaps for during WWII) but no train I've ever seen was totally composed of a series of rolling rust-buckets!

Unfortunately, many of today's modelers dramatically over-weather their models. This used to be a practice among narrow gauge modelers 20 years ago as well - until they woke up to reality! The fact is that in a rail yard, the eye is usually drawn to the worst looking car of the bunch, glossing over the fact that there are many less detiorated examples flanking it. Thus, the observer comes away with a mental image of only the untypical examples. I'm just offering a bit of advice not to be too drastic in your weathering if you want your models to really look believable.

NYW&B
 




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