Faiding colors?

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jbaakko

Diesel Detail Freak
I have a question, how would I go about making the yellow & blue on my GP7 slightly faided? White chalk? I'm gonna pick up some weathering supplies this week from my LHS, and I'm wondering what I can use in the way of colors besides the normal.

The GP7u has decals now, but I need to do a bit more painting on the long hood, to get the bonnet, and I need to track down some decals...
 

mtrpls

Ignorance is Patriotic
White chalk does the trick for me. I always put a coat or two of white chalk on every freight car I weather. Follow that with some black chalk, some rust, and the car looks faded, dirty and rusty. Be sure to secure it with dullcote, though.
 

RCH

Been Nothin' Since Frisco
I drybrush artists oils on my dark models. I use various shades of the base color, mixed "on the fly" in addition to straight white. The key is doing it so lightly there are no brush strokes. Then you build layers upon layers.

I have had very poor results with chalk for this sort of thing. I mean, once you've got the chalk on there it looks great, but the dullcote erases all your work. You can build up many layers, but it's still never very effective. The alternative is never touching your models. That's something I definitely can't do!
 

jbaakko

Diesel Detail Freak
I really want to faid this one, cause w/o it the yellow is too bright. The Prototype for my GP7 is faided. I'll have to check out the chalks, and then if I don't like it, I'll find those artist oils. Sounds like this is gonna be fun! Anyone know of where I can get the Step safety decals, and "GP7" decals from? AND, anyone have a clue to which warning labels are located on the side of the long hood?
 

grande man

Bonafied Grande Nut
I'd recommend a "practice run" on something less valuable than the loco. I dirty our models rather than fade them, but I would think the Dull Cote and white chalk would work well for your application. A light colored wash might also be effective. Have fun!!!
 

jbaakko

Diesel Detail Freak
well with chalks I can't really go to wrong... they can come back off, anyways i can make a test run on my Atlas GT boxcar.
 

jbaakko

Diesel Detail Freak
Testing...

Testing the artists oils, using "Antique white" on an IC hi-cube 40' PD box:
View attachment 2120 View attachment 2121

I like how it turns out, have to practice a bit before I hit up the GP7, as you can see there's a bit to much white in a few of the crevices, oh well, it'll later get layered with rustall, and sanded slightly to wear the printing...

P.S. please don't comment on the stand (SD40-2 frame), it hurts her feelings...
 

HaggisKennedy

Coal Shoveler
Airbrush with white overspray. Fill color cup with thinner, and put one drop of white in. Mix well and spray. Will not be noticeable in one coat, may need multiple passes.

This was demo'd to me by Gary Walton, MR-ding contributor, on a bunch of those (dark blue) Pacer Stacktrain 53' containers in a weathering clinic.

Kennedy
 

jbaakko

Diesel Detail Freak
HaggisKennedy said:
Airbrush with white overspray. Fill color cup with thinner, and put one drop of white in. Mix well and spray. Will not be noticeable in one coat, may need multiple passes.

This was demo'd to me by Gary Walton, MR-ding contributor, on a bunch of those (dark blue) Pacer Stacktrain 53' containers in a weathering clinic.

Kennedy
I'll test that, once with model paint, once with rubbing alcohol and artists oils... On to the SP box (which will eventialy become a scrap box anyways).
 

RCH

Been Nothin' Since Frisco
Kennedy gives a good recommendation of using an extremely thinned white. The only danger with that method (or really any lightening method, when you get right down to it) is that the change is so gradual because of doing so many coats over a couple hours you can easily not notice how much you're accumulating and overdo it. It's best to have a factory painted equivalent model to place next to the one you're lightening in between coats. You'll see the true change you're making and lessen the likelihood that you'll overdo it.
 

IronBeltKen

Lazy Daydreamer
RCH said:
Kennedy gives a good recommendation of using an extremely thinned white. The only danger with that method (or really any lightening method, when you get right down to it) is that the change is so gradual because of doing so many coats over a couple hours you can easily not notice how much you're accumulating and overdo it. It's best to have a factory painted equivalent model to place next to the one you're lightening in between coats. You'll see the true change you're making and lessen the likelihood that you'll overdo it.
Before I did mine, I painted some scrap styrene in the same orange color, applied black decals, and dullcoated it, then test-sprayed my white wash over those. I made varying numbers of passes over 3 different pieces, logging the number for each one, and waited for them to dry. Then I had a better idea as to what would work best on the actual models.
 

RCH

Been Nothin' Since Frisco
CSX_road_slug said:
Before I did mine, I painted some scrap styrene in the same orange color, applied black decals, and dullcoated it, then test-sprayed my white wash over those. I made varying numbers of passes over 3 different pieces, logging the number for each one, and waited for them to dry. Then I had a better idea as to what would work best on the actual models.
And ladies and gentlemen, that's how it's done. Make the art of painting into a science and it can be done in the dark...

Half the time, I *am* painting in near darkness.... that's when my girls fall asleep so I can work on the trains. :D
 

jbaakko

Diesel Detail Freak
I just beat up an old boxcar... lol, never gone throught the work to make a sheet to test it on, lol. I should be testing sample #2 sometime this weekend, on my well car.
 




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