Color of Road Striping

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GNMT76

Active Member
During the transition era, c. 1947-1955, was white or yellow the predominant color for road striping in most states? My layout is set in Montana.

EDIT: Where can I get a roll of 1/32" width tape, which looks to be true to HO scale?

Thanks!
 
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CGW121

Active Member
In Illinois during the late 50s early 60s white was the center lines and outside lines. Yellow was used for no passing lines. If a yellow stipe was on yous side you were not suppose to pass. Sometime later it changed but no idea when.
 

Sirfoldalot

Product Tester ACME INC.
Staff member
In Illinois during the late 50s early 60s white was the center lines and outside lines. Yellow was used for no passing lines. If a yellow stipe was on yous side you were not suppose to pass. Sometime later it changed but no idea when.
I do not remember any white outside lines on the roads during the 50s early 60s?
But I was not privy to many other states either.
 

Boris

Beach Bum
My recollection, was striping only on major state highways, especially multiple lane thoroughfares. City streets did not have any stripig, except for crosswalks on school routes, and parking space demarcation in business districts. it may be my imagination, but I always associated the introduction of yellow lines, with the introduction of red stop signs.
 

twforeman

Well-Known Member
I'm modeling 1958 Mid-Western Montana. I didn't put a lot of effort into research, but my plan so far is yellow stop signs, no stripes on concrete city type streets and just white dashes on asphalt secondary roads.





I might replace the RR Crossing signs since the GN cross bucks were at a 30 degree angle in the 50s...
 

jdetray

Well-Known Member
Where can I get a roll of 1/32" width tape, which looks to be true to HO scale?
I'm a bit late to this thread -- sorry!

Searching for "chart tape" or "graphic art tape" will find several sources, including Amazon. I've had good luck with Chartpak brand chart tape, but other brands are probably fine.

As for width, most road and highway stripes are 5 or 6 inches wide, so you'll want 1/16-inch tape (not 1/32-inch) for HO scale road stripes.

1/16-inch is equal to approximately 5.4 inches in HO scale.

Below is a scene from my N-scale layout where I used 1/32-inch chart tape for the road stripes.

- Jeff

road_weathered1_1000.png
 

GNMT76

Active Member
I'm a bit late to this thread -- sorry!

Searching for "chart tape" or "graphic art tape" will find several sources, including Amazon. I've had good luck with Chartpak brand chart tape, but other brands are probably fine.

As for width, most road and highway stripes are 5 or 6 inches wide, so you'll want 1/16-inch tape (not 1/32-inch) for HO scale road stripes.

1/16-inch is equal to approximately 5.4 inches in HO scale.

Below is a scene from my N-scale layout where I used 1/32-inch chart tape for the road stripes.

- Jeff

View attachment 115500
Thanks, Jeff. I've since corrected myself and bought a roll of 1/16" tape.
 




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