Bad Can of Dullcote

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Greg@mnrr

Section Hand
I just opened a can of Testor's Dullcote and when using and after it has dried, it has a slightly gloss appearance instead of being dull. I shaked the can extremely well before using it on some models.

I'm wondering if I got a bad can of the product?

Greg
 

MHinLA

Well-Known Member
Do you have or can you buy another bottle of it and see if it too dries the same ? What about taking 2 of the same, say, freight cars, coating one then comparing it to the other ? Is the D coat an old bottle ? Might it be your imagination ? What about a 2nd coat on same object ?
Finally. You could reach Testors online. They might agree they made some bad ones and send you a new one, gratis....
 
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Greg@mnrr

Section Hand
MHinLA: Its a brand new can of Dullcote and it reacts on different materials the same, one or two coats and the same result. I'll try Testors and see what happens. I emailed Testors and let's wait and see what happens.

Thanks.
 
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GeeTee

Active Member
Sounds like you might have a can thats settled , you might have to tie it to the back of a pickup truck and drive it around for a few days.
Just because its new to you , does't mean that its not old , you can try to read the date code failing that see if it has any rust on the can ,Particularly on the bottom rim . if the can has rust spots , its been around awhile.
 

Espeefan

Well-Known Member
Have you tried another coat to see if things get any flatter? Dullcote is just spray lacquer with talc added. I doubt the can has settled as you'd get mostly talc in that case or nothing at all if the pickup tube got clogged.
 

Greg@mnrr

Section Hand
Sherrel: How correct you are...I'm looking for the receipt from Walthers.

GeeTee:
I haven't had the need to use the other can(s) and I dd purchase a larger, rattle can of dull finish from Testors.

Tom: I do have some Dullcote that I could air brush on, but the cans are faster and don't require cleaning.

Greg
 

Greg@mnrr

Section Hand
Greg, this is what I've been using rather than Dullcote.
Buying Dullcote I felt liked I'd been raped without even being kissed first! This does a good job and is a LOT cheaper! I always spray a couple of light coats rather than one heavier one.
I do have a can of this product that I purchased just before being house bound. I haven't try it as of yet, but I've read good reports about the product. Some have said that it is a direct replacement for Dullcote for flat finishes.

Greg
 

GeeTee

Active Member
I do have a can of this product that I purchased just before being house bound. I haven't try it as of yet, but I've read good reports about the product. Some have said that it is a direct replacement for Dullcote for flat finishes.

Greg
Just make sure its not lacquer based , some Rustoleum products are . Lacquer based paints can "craze" plastic , you can get away with lacquer if you spay it in really thin coats . Testors is an enamel base. The old Floquils were lacquer based . Just test it on styrene , like a piece of white packing foam or peanuts.
 

GeeTee

Active Member
Isn't Testor's Dullcote a lacquer formulated spray coating and usually doesn't cause any plastic damage since it being sprayed over a previously applied paint?

Greg
Its been 20 years since I use a can It may be laquer ,

I check some of my old stock , and "Clear Cote" is laquer and the Testors paint cans say enamel. And now that I think about it I think I did have problems with "Dull Cote" if was spayed to thick .

Floquil you had to put an primer coat on plastic. Most just spayed it on lightly so that its almost cured when it hit the surface.

Enamels tend to have high viscosity ( thicker and slower flow) Lacquer is usually low viscosity (fast flow ,thinner) .Lacquer usally uses xylene , what Floquil called Dio Sol for the solvent/thinner because it has a low viscosity/surface tension to make the paint flow and atomize better (smaller droplets) .

Most paints are supposed to have less than 2.5 % ? solvent to meet EPA low VOC standards,

Bottom Line : if its Laquer based you test it first to see how "active" it is . Especially if you have a lot of time invested in the model.


Hold the phone guess what I just found , I have a can of Rustoleam Matte Finish I purchased to coat a custom lettered keyboard , I spayed it on some Styrofoam and it chewed up pretty good , will post pics later. Must eat now.
 
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