Sharpen Rail Nippers

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santafewillie

Same Ol' Buzzard
While I sharpen my Exacto blades, I have never needed to sharpen my Xuron Rail Nippers. Unless they have been abused, think piano wire, they really shouldn't need re-sharpening. I have never used them for any metal other than rail, but have used them to nip plastic parts from sprues. Personally I would be more apt to purchase a new pair as they are rather inexpensive everywhere but Amazon.
 

wvg_ca

nerdlinger
i sharpen mine, and it doesnt take long with a belt sander. usually i decide to do it 'now' rather than wait for a new pair .
 

Selector

Well-Known Member
A small flat file should help. They're hard steel....and hardened. But so are the Rail Nippers. So, you won't accomplish much easily, or in jig time. But if you can keep a small flat file at the correct angle, and don't mind several dozen slides on each blade, you should be able to keep them sharp.
 

boatwrench

Active Member
A small flat file should help. They're hard steel....and hardened. But so are the Rail Nippers. So, you won't accomplish much easily, or in jig time. But if you can keep a small flat file at the correct angle, and don't mind several dozen slides on each blade, you should be able to keep them sharp.
While sharpening my pruning shears and scissors saw the rail nippers sitting there on the bench. Gave them a few passes with a flat file. Just curious what others were doing with theirs.
 

Selector

Well-Known Member
Not my 16 year old Xuron nippers, Mike. Mine are 'flush cut' lopper style, with the sharp edges closing against each other. If they sheared, they'd leave a small ridge partway through the face of the cut on one of the two pieces of rail....depending on which way they were facing.
 

MikeGTW

Signalman, ESQ
So I went downstairs and found mine marked 2175B I have an older pair somewhere they be hiding from me at this time

I cut some atlas rail and I don't see any ridge on the end tried it several times I have a mini microscope and looked at the ends
DSC_0055.JPG
It's hard to see the offset in the blades it's such a small offset

Are yours marked Xuron just curious One other thing Xuron got a patent 50 years ago on the micro shear
 

Selector

Well-Known Member
Mike, sorry it took so long. I have visitors and atrial fibrillation driving me crazy. Girls are gone shopping and I am in a better space.

I took the photo just now of this well-used Xuron nipper. I didn't realize that Xuron's own descriptor says 'shear', clearly stamped into the handle, as you can see for yourself. Yet, the definition of shear is two surfaces moving across each other, which these obviously do not. They pinch, or cut, metal, not like tin shears where the blades slide closely against and then past each other. Maybe it amounts to the same thing accomplished by the time the effect is achieved, separating the single item into two parts.

However, you are quite correct in calling them shears. I have learned something. Not a bad day at all!



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MikeGTW

Signalman, ESQ
Crandell
To me when they call them shears I'm thinking like my metal shears for sheet metal like heavy duty scissors
I know mine I had to look at the end of them at the point end with a magnifier to see the offset It's not very much at all
Mine just has the Xuron name and 2175B But it works

Mike
 

Selector

Well-Known Member
Yes, I was thinking tin snips, or garden shears....the blades are not-quite-flush and slide very closely past each other. The result is a cut like paper. The item I show above won't let the blades move past each other even a small fraction of a mm. Their sharp edges meet, fully aligned, and you can't close the handles any further.
 

MikeGTW

Signalman, ESQ
Crandell
I did some more research just cause I had some time and found this If you look up that patent number it was granted in 1973 and it has a diagram showing the offset in the blades So I think the design has been like that since then They also show on their site a 2175 flush cutter designed for wire and a 2175B Track cutter Not sure what the difference is must be something but from the pictures they look the same

https://patents.google.com/patent/US3774301A/en
 

wvg_ca

nerdlinger
just a fyi .. after i sharpen [with a belt sander] the rail nippers, they become a 'flush cutter' , they no longer have the small offset the the rail nippers do ... in other words the jaws meet directy, not with a small offset ..
 




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