New 1/72nd modeling!

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tootnkumin

Well-Known Member
Staff member
It doesn't work out, it just happened sort of backwards. Take a 7mm track gauge for "Ought" scale, take 1/2 of that for Half Ought or 3.5mm. So make that equal to standard gauge of 4' 8.5" and what work out what scale ratio that ends up being?
Actually I've always understood Ought gauge (not scale) to have been chosen at 1.25" (1-1/4") just as a nominal measurement by toy train makers back in the dark ages and the size (scale) of the models to run on that track in a likewise manner. "OO" or as Hornby called it "Dublo" was just 5/8", or half of "O" and the "scale" of the trains, just as abitrary. Being that 3'6" gauge works out at as the perfect size for 1/64 scale for OO/HO track in the imperial foot and inches measuring criteria, suited me fine in NZ, although I never did get past doing anything more than draw drawings of loco plans in that scale from photos and known overall lengths and heights. I was very surprised many years later to come across printed drawings in a hobby shop, that showed that my drawings were pretty accurate generally. I was helped by my mother, who went with me to the railyards in town, where we wandered around the locos near the train shed, while I took photos with her old Box Brownie camera and took measurements of bits and pieces, sometimes on engines that were standing, hissing steam. Not another soul to be seen, never got "shooed" away. Was that what's referred to as "The good old days"?
 
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NP2626

Guest
Interesting discussion, makes me wonder if any of it works out to being hard and fast by scale standards. However, since all this is pretty hard and fast, it doesn't make any sense to wonder about it, as so few of us actually lay ties and spike rail to it. I'm good with what we have!
 

hminky

Member
Just got a copy of "Model Railroad Planning 2018" with Doug's article.

Great layout but the article lacked the most important point; vehicles, structures and people.

From my earlier post I am sure that most people asked this question:

"Interesting, but I feel it's reinventing the flanged wheel to solve an issue that isn't really an issue. Some structures can be modified, sure, and short figures can be used, but what do you do for vehicles and other structural elements? Hard enough to find true O scale vehicles. It would be an even bigger scratchbuilding scale than O or even S. If you like it, go for it! Think I'll stick with On30, myself."

Creating interest in a new scale that question has to be answered, been there done that.

Got 12 downloads on my 1/72 Scale from the website.:eek:

EDIT: Suggest the endeavor be called "Scale One Seventy Two" with a nomenclature of "Scale1/72". No need to use a narrow gauge designation, doubt if any one will build standard gauge.

Harold
 
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tootnkumin

Well-Known Member
Staff member
From what I see of the models being run on my clubs raised outdoor layout (Mini-minimal scenery, the station is but a platform), scale to accurately matching gauge is a requirement, low in the scheme of things. Getting it to run on something "near enough" (lot of kitbuilding) matters more. No-one is getting on there with a micrometer.
 

hminky

Member
Doug's layout is really outstanding.

Looks like narrow gauge to me.

utube_cns1.jpg


Harold
 
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NP2626

Guest
Harold, without doubt, it looks like narrow gauge and specifically the Colorado & Southern. The track looks like standard gauge to me, to many ties and the ties too short. This is something that Doug is obviously able to overlook and the benefits of being able to do so, far outweigh the problems for me, also. I've always loved Harry Brunk's Union Central and Northern which was based on the C&S. Even though I model the Northern Pacific in 1953, I am a true blue Narrow Gauge Aficionado. This occurring after the wife and I rode the Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad, in 2015. I've said this before; but, were I to start over, I would build a layout in Sn3 of portions of the Rio Grande Southern. The RGS is my favorite railroad! I understand that the day to day work the RGS handled was paltry by all accounts. However, I love the country it traveled through and particularly the Ophir Loop area. I also love the sunrise Rio Grande Southern logo used on many Cabooses and locos. I have even thought about selling off all my N.P. equipment and buying Athearn/Roundhouse consolidations and 36 foot freight cars and using my present day layout as an RGS layout.
 
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NP2626

Guest
From what I see of the models being run on my clubs raised outdoor layout (Mini-minimal scenery, the station is but a platform), scale to accurately matching gauge is a requirement, low in the scheme of things. Getting it to run on something "near enough" (lot of kitbuilding) matters more. No-one is getting on there with a micrometer.

I think if you can't think outside the box with this hobby, your slant on things are very myopic!
 
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NP2626

Guest
Toot, Yes it is. I know that there are World War One Aviation enthusiasts who build models of WW1 airplanes and mount them on sticks with bases and play some type of games with them. If you look at 1/72nd scale model airplanes there are many, many to chose from and almost all will have figures that are usable for Model Railroading. Doug Tagsold also talked about using HO Structures to populate his layout by resizing the doors to accommodate the extra height of 1/72nd scale figures.

I think that this new idea has Merritt! My only problem with it is I don't think HO track is convincing as narrow Gauge track as the ties are to close together and not long enough.
 

cv_acr

Well-Known Member
I think that this new idea has Merritt! My only problem with it is I don't think HO track is convincing as narrow Gauge track as the ties are to close together and not long enough.

Maybe, but handlaying track to get a proper narrow gauge look is easier than some of the other modifications or kitbashing/scratchbuilding rolling stock in an odd-ball scale not supported by manufacturers.
 

hminky

Member
Maybe, but handlaying track to get a proper narrow gauge look is easier than some of the other modifications or kitbashing/scratchbuilding rolling stock in an odd-ball scale not supported by manufacturers.
There are certain eras and locales that work better with oddball scales, 1/72 works well for the 1870-80s.

172unitrack4.jpg


If you want to do Colorado in the 1930's there are several expensive alternatives that are better.

Oddball things require going out of the box to work.

Harold
 
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NP2626

Guest
Maybe, but handlaying track to get a proper narrow gauge look is easier than some of the other modifications or kitbashing/scratchbuilding rolling stock in an odd-ball scale not supported by manufacturers.

I have to assume you have not read Doug Tagsold's article in the 2018 Model Railroad Planning? As what you think may be difficult, is not so.
 

hminky

Member
I have to assume you have not read Doug Tagsold's article in the 2018 Model Railroad Planning? As what you think may be difficult, is not so.
From the article:

"Most visitors won't notice the difference of this scale. To them, the C&S is
simply an HO standard gauge layout with a narrow gauge feel." - Doug Tagsold

Modeling Colorado in 1/72 on HO track to most people will still look like HO.

Doug's work looks like HO unless you are a believer. To me it looks like C&S narrow gauge.

But then, I have a run away imagination.

Harold
 

otiscnj

Well-Known Member
Another scale? Fine for scratch builders I guess. Also great if you want to include model airplanes, and military type models.

Personnally, I've got enough of a choice between HO, O, and N. S I've always thought might be a great compromise between HO and O, or TT, between HO & N, but don't have the time, space, or money to pursue either.
 
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NP2626

Guest
I did not post this thread in an effort to get others modeling in 1/72; or, promote the scale. The scale that get modeled is the choice of the person modeling it. I posted this thread in an effort to get people to think outside the box. Use a little imagination, maybe it will help with your modeling in the scale of your choice! However, if you lack imagination and can't comprehend that other scales than O, S, HO, N; or, Z might be interesting, that's fine! However, you do need to understand that those other scales, at some point in time, came from someone's imagination.
 

hminky

Member
Another scale? Fine for scratch builders I guess. Also great if you want to include model airplanes, and military type models.

Personnally, I've got enough of a choice between HO, O, and N. S I've always thought might be a great compromise between HO and O, or TT, between HO & N, but don't have the time, space, or money to pursue either.
Actually no scratchbuilding to have 1/72 narrow gauge. A complete 1/72 narrow gauge train with cars of the correct size can be developed from common HO models.

train_1.jpg


train_2.jpg


train_3.jpg


train_4.jpg


mil_road_box1.jpg


mil_road_caboose1.jpg


Can't do early narrow gauge without 1/72 and a real imagination. No other scale works without scratchbuilding.

The gauge was found on several early narrow gauge railroads. The track matches HO track.

AMRRroundHouse.jpg


172unitrack4.jpg


Just some of us live outside the box and like new ideas. Not everything has to be ho-hum.

Harold
 
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