I have a small dilemma.

ModelRailroadForums.com is a free Model Railroad Discussion Forum and photo gallery. We cover all scales and sizes of model railroads. Whether you're a master model railroader or just getting started, you'll find something of interest here.


Motley

Active Member
The crowd roars. You got it man, you got it!!

So now when you wire it up to the reversing units. The black tracks will be wired to the DCC Command station. And the blue tracks, and everything in the blue loop (including the spurs, yards tracks) will be wired to auto-reversing power.

Then on the second auto-reversing unit. Wire the black tracks to the DCC Command station. And the red tracks, and everything in the red loop (including the spur tracks) to the auto-reversing power.

Like this.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

fcwilt

Active Member
I think there may be one problem he might encounter with the wiring as proposed.

For the simple reverse loop as shown in the wiring diagram you could not have more then one train at a time leaving/entering the reverse loop.

However on his plan both of the reverse loops (as suggested) have, if you will, two "entrances" due to the presence of that "siding" in front of that large green rectangle.

Thus you could have a train trying to enter the reverse loop at one entrance and another train trying to leave at the other entrance - and that will cause the "reverser" to have a nervous breakdown. :rolleyes:

Now it's late and I'm tired but I think this is correct.
 

Motley

Active Member
Ya you are probably right. But this plan is pretty much a single track mainline, with the passing siding. So he probably will only run one train at a time. It would be difficult to run two trains and not have them crash into each other.

Dale you can still run two trains though. Keep one on the passing siding on the bottom there. Bring the other train around stop next to it on the other track. Then bring the other train out from the siding.
 
Nice track plan, I am just reading this thread for the first time tonight.

If I might suggest a couple of things:

Where the lower peninsula Industrial district is, put a tail track to enable switching without fouling the main. I like to leave one train running while working another.

Same for Yellow Yard, you want a track there perhaps going around the point that is as long as your longest track in the yard so that you can pull a track and drill it back in.
 

dinwitty

Member
I was thinking about how to put some mini fiddling yard to introduce/remove cars from the layout. The top right looks easy to put in a double track fiddler off the loop. I have a Car Ferry on my layout just for that purpose. That could be possible or if theres room, a narrow shelf on a wall extending out can do the same. Theres still room to add industries if your creative and get more operating interest.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Motley

Active Member
I was thinking about how to put some mini fiddling yard to introduce/remove cars from the layout. The top right looks easy to put in a double track fiddler off the loop. I have a Car Ferry on my layout just for that purpose. That could be possible or if theres room, a narrow shelf on a wall extending out can do the same. Theres still room to add industries if your creative and get more operating interest.
Ya thats a great idea.

Something like this....

 

rzw0wr

Newbie Switchman
I started removing the foam inclines yesterday. What a PITA.
I am tring to figure out how I will remove or at least smooth down the Liquid Nails I used to attach everything.

I also remembered that Anyrail displays Fast Tracks turnouts in the shortest length possible. This is a real problem when trying to lay the turnouts.
They are too short for rail joiners. So when back to the layout drawing and added a few inches to the length of each.
This changed the layout a little however, it is still about the same.

I am going to try to get the rest of the foam off of the layout today.
I drew up the bench work in Sketchup the other day to see what I will have to change.
It did not loo like it is going to be too much work.

Here is a picture.
It did not change much.

10x14 First Rotated.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:

rzw0wr

Newbie Switchman
It is on plywood. I have tried in the past to sand it off with my orbital sander. That takes forever.
 

Sirfoldalot

Product Tester ACME INC.
Staff member
No, no ... You need a whatchamacallit. One of the most handy tools I have ever used, and I cannot think of the name at the moment. Vibrates back and forth with about a 1 inch wide saw blade on it. You would have it done in a flash!

Ah ha .. Oscillating tool from harbor freight. Get the 20-25% coupon from the web. You will find many uses for it.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Motley

Active Member
Got this off the liquid nails website....

How To Remove LIQUID NAILS Adhesive Products from Building Materials
In general, LIQUID NAILS construction adhesive and caulk products can be scraped off when they are softened either by:
Heating above 140°F with an electric heat gun or blow dryer
Coating the adhesive with petroleum jelly or mineral spirits for several hours to several days (NOTE: Mineral spirits are not recommended for tub surrounds, whether vinyl, plastic, painted or varnished.)
If building materials are bonded, you must separate the items as explained below before removing the construction adhesive.
What you'll need:
Windshield cut-out wire (also called music wire), available at most automotive parts stores
Safety gloves and/or handles for the wire to keep hands from being cut
Safety goggles or a face shield
Two screwdrivers to prop parts into an open position
Wire cutters
What you'll do:
Cut a length of wire about two or three feet longer than the width of the part to be removed.
Starting at one corner, work the middle of the wire under the edge of the part.
If using handles, connect them to the wire. If not, be sure to wear heavy safety gloves to protect your hands.
Saw back and forth with the wire, using moderate pressure. This should start to cut the construction adhesive. After a few inches have been cut, use the screwdrivers to prop open the gap. This helps prevent thermoplastic adhesives from re-adhering, which can happen as friction causes significant warming of the adhesive.
Continue sawing, moving the screwdrivers as you go. Continue until the part is loose and can be removed.
Scrape away residual construction adhesive. If the adhesive is too hard to scrape, apply a light layer of baby oil, wait an hour, then scrape. Repeat if necessary. NOTE: Do not use baby oil or any other softening material if painting of the surface is planned, as it will stain.
 

rzw0wr

Newbie Switchman
Hmmmm, good advice for both posts.

Thanks, I will give them a try today.
I like the mineral spirits idea.
 

rzw0wr

Newbie Switchman
Off to Lowes to get an oscillating whatchamacallit. :)

The mineral spirits works well after you remove the foam however, the smell in my work shop is nasty.
 

rzw0wr

Newbie Switchman
Bench stripped of all foam.
3 full, 40 gallon bags.
I figured each bag was between $50.00 to $75.00 dollars. :p

Here is my nude bench work. Getting ready to add a 24" wing on the front, then cut out the center walk way.

downsize[1].jpg

Appears to be a little fuzzy, but you get the idea. :eek:
 

Motley

Active Member
Wow you made quick work of those foam risers. I use them and I know how expensive they are ouch.

I don't see any extruded pink or blue foam on your benchwork. You really should add a 2" layer of the pink extruded builders foam at Home Depot or Lowes, etc. You put that foam layer on top of your benchwork using cheap latex caulk. Then you paint it an earth color like light brown (dirt) using any cheap latex type wall paint. Then you glue your cork roadbed down to the foam using latex caulk. Then glue the track to the cork roadbed using the same latex caulk.

The foam layer allows for creating scenery such as mountains, cutting out rivers and creeks. Or just carving out depressions. To get rid of that flat look.

This foam is not the white beaded foam that those risers are made out of. Here is what I'm talking about. http://www.foamular.com/foam/products/foamular-1000.aspx

Also note that if you get this stuff. It has a thin plastic prtotective cover on one side and that needs to be peeled off before gluing it down.

This here is the river I carved out of the foam. I have 1.5" of pink foam on top of the plywood.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

logandsawman

Well-Known Member
The foam layer allows for creating scenery such as mountains, cutting out rivers and creeks. Or just carving out depressions. To get rid of that flat look.

]
I know this seems to be the most popular way to make terrain, but in (road) engineering, which is where I work, which is somewhat similar to model railroad engineering, some prefer to go up rather than down. That means making predominately fill impacts and not cut impacts. I guess you can use foam in this way, too, but cheap thin plywood with wood risers is an option for woodworker types.

Not to say that foam is wrong, just that some people like other materials. (and not to resuscitate that whole foam vs wood debate.) lasm
 




Affiliate Disclosure: We may receive a commision from some of the links and ads shown on this website (Learn More Here)


ModelRailroadForums.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com

RailroadBookstore.com - An online railroad bookstore featuring a curated selection of new and used railroad books. Railroad pictorials, railroad history, steam locomotives, passenger trains, modern railroading. Hundreds of titles available, most at discount prices! We also have a video and children's book section.

ModelRailroadBookstore.com - An online model railroad bookstore featuring a curated selection of new and used books. Layout design, track plans, scenery and structure building, wiring, DCC, Tinplate, Toy Trains, Price Guides and more.

Top